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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Fort Oglethorpe in Walker County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Whitaker’s Brigade.

 
 
Whitaker’s Brigade. Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 6, 2009
1. Whitaker’s Brigade. Marker
Inscription. [Text from the First Tablet]:

Whitaker’s Brigade.

Steedman’s Division......Granger’s Corps.
Brig. Gen. Walter C. Whitaker.
Sept. 20, 1863. 2 to 6 P.M.

96th Illinois………………………Col. Thomas E. Champion
115th Illinois……………………..Col. Jesse H. Moore
84th Indiana…………………...…Col. Nelson Trusler
22nd Michigan…………………...Col. Heber LeFavour
22nd Michigan…………………...Lieut. Col. William Sanborn
22nd Michigan…………………...Capt. Alonzo Keeler
40th Ohio………………………...Lieut. Col. William Jones
89th Ohio………………...………Col. Caleb H. Carlton
89th Ohio………………...………Capt. Isaac C. Nelson
Ohio Light Artillery
18th Battery……………………...Capt. Charles C. Aleshire

M

[Text from the Second Tablet]:

M

This Brigade being the advance of Steedman's Division reached the Snodgrass House at about 1:30 P.M. As soon as it passed Brannan's right it faced the ridge and drove the Confederates from it. Its battery, upon arrival at the Snodgrass House, was sent to the left of Harker's line, and was engaged there till night. The 22nd Michigan and 89th Ohio were temporarily attached, and when the Brigade withdrew at sunset to the ridge in the rear these regiments were not notified, and with
Whitaker’s Brigade. Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 6, 2009
2. Whitaker’s Brigade. Marker
View of this historical marker in the right foreground, in the midst of the position occupied by Whitaker's Brigade late in the battle to control the ridge of Snodgrass Hill. Off in the center of the surrounding woods is a faint view of the historical marker for the 21st OVI.
the 21st Ohio were mostly captured at dusk by Trigg's and Kelly's Confederate Brigades of Preston's Division. At 7 P.M. the Brigade withdrew to Rossville. Strength in action 2677 officers and men. Casualties: Killed 154; Wounded 654; Captured or Missing 518; Total 1326. Percentage of loss 49.5.
 
Erected 1890 by the Chickamauga-Chattanooga Battlefield Board. (Marker Number MT-647.)
 
Location. 34° 55.629′ N, 85° 16.322′ W. Marker is near Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, in Walker County. Marker can be reached from Vittetoe Road west of Vittetoe-Chickamauga Road when traveling west. Touch for map. This historical marker is located in the northwest section of the Chickamauga National Military Park, near the Snodgrass Hill area of the driving tour, along the part of the battlefield known as Horseshoe Ridge, more specially on Hill #3 of Horseshoe Ridge. To view this historical marker drive to the parking area for Horseshoe Ridge (just beyond the Snodgrass Hill tour stop) and proceed westward on foot, along the southern crest of the ridge for a little more than 0.2 of a mile, to the high ground on Hill #3. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Oglethorpe GA 30742, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 115th Illinois Infantry (a few steps from
Whitaker’s Brigade image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 6, 2009
3. Whitaker’s Brigade
View of the regimental markers and monuments that indicate the position of Whitaker's Brigade on the western ridge of Snodgrass Hill.
this marker); Granger's Headquarters Shell Monument (a few steps from this marker); 22nd Michigan Infantry (a few steps from this marker); 84th Indiana Infantry Regiment (a few steps from this marker); 89th Ohio Infantry (a few steps from this marker); 2nd South Carolina Infantry Regiment (a few steps from this marker); 40th Ohio Infantry (a few steps from this marker); 41st Tennessee Infantry (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Oglethorpe.
 
More about this marker. When revisiting the site of this historical marker on August 1, 2012, I noticed that the metal plaque on this monument is now painted a different color. Whereas before the background color was white and the text was printed in blue, now the background color is blue and the text is painted in white.
 
Regarding Whitaker’s Brigade.. Whitaker's Brigade was the forward brigade of Steedman's Division which arrived at the Union position on Snodgrass Hill at the critical moment
Whitaker’s Brigade. Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 1, 2012
4. Whitaker’s Brigade. Marker
of the battle. When directed to provide support for the Union right flank, Steedman directed Whitaker's Brigade to rush up to crest of the ridge, arriving just in time to drive off the Confederate forces that were on the verge of flanking the beleaguered 21st OVI, situated on what had been the extreme right flank of the Union line of battle.
 
Additional comments.
1. One of the few heroes from the Battle of Chickamauga, James B. Steedman
OK, I confess, of all of the many civil war battlefields and sites that I have ever visited, the right flank of the Union position on Snodgrass Hill has to be one of my favorite Civil War sites. Not only is it the site where my favorite regiment, the 21st OVI made up of citizens from northwest Ohio, made its famous battlefield stand against the overwhelming forces of General Longstreet's left flank, but it is also the site where home grown (Toledo, Ohio), hero, James B. Steedman made his timely battlefield arrival and saved the day for what was left of the Union Army of the Cumberland.

The background behind this action is that Granger's Corps were being held in reserve, but as the battle raged on and they never received any orders or communication, they became so concerned that the decision was made to march towards the sounds of the battlefield action without
Whitaker’s Brigade. Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 1, 2012
5. Whitaker’s Brigade. Marker
Close-up view of the text on the first tablet.
ever having received any orders to do so. The end result was that Steedman's Division arrived at the Union position on Snodgrass Hill at the critical moment of the battle. When directed to provide support for the Union right flank, Steedman directed Whitaker's Brigade to rush up to crest of the ridge, arriving just in time to drive off the Confederate forces that were on the verge of flanking the beleaguered 21st OVI, situated on what had been the extreme right flank of the Union line of battle.

I have included several pictures of two monuments dedicated to James B. Steedman that are located back in his hometown of Toledo, Ohio, where he became an honored hero because of his role in this battlefield action.
    — Submitted November 3, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Whitaker’s Brigade. Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 1, 2012
6. Whitaker’s Brigade. Marker
Close-up view of the text on the second tablet.
James B. Steedman Monument image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 18, 2009
7. James B. Steedman Monument
This monument to James B. Steedman is located in Toledo, Ohio, in Riverside Park, near the intersection of Summit Street and Galena Street.
James B. Steedman Monument image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, May 18, 2009
8. James B. Steedman Monument
View of the monument dedicated to the hometown Civil War hero, James B. Steedman, at its location in Riverside Park, in the north side of Toledo, Ohio.
James B. Steedman's Gravestone image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, April 20, 2006
9. James B. Steedman's Gravestone
View of the gravestone of James B. Steedman, located in historic Woodlawn Cemetery, in Toledo, Ohio.
James B. Steedman's Gravestone image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, April 20, 2006
10. James B. Steedman's Gravestone
View of the gravesite memorial to the hometown Civil War hero, James B. Steedman.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 16, 2017. This page originally submitted on November 3, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 1,011 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 3, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   4, 5, 6. submitted on August 7, 2012, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on November 3, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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