Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Richmond, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Enterprise and Iron

 
 
Enterprise and Iron Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, November 3, 2009
1. Enterprise and Iron Marker
Inscription. By 1844, Tredegar Iron Works managers used this building for an office and as a residence. After the Civil War, it became the principal iron works office. It was rebuilt after being damaged by fire in 1903. During most of the history of Tredegar, the company was owned and operated by Joseph Reid Anderson and members of his family, with a few skilled workers and managers. Ownership by families or limited partnerships was not unusual for industrial organizations in the 1800s, but it became increasingly rare in large industries by the 20th century.

The main section of this structure originated as a three-story brick currying shop and dwelling, part of a series of tanyard operations in this vicinity from about 1799 to 1827. Tanned leather provided belting for early industries, and harness, seat coverings, and strapping for the carts, drays, and wagons that moved products in the industrial city.
 
Location. 37° 32.128′ N, 77° 26.713′ W. Marker is in Richmond, Virginia. Marker can be reached from Tredegar Street 0.1 miles west of South 5th Street. Touch for map. This marker is located outside the American Civil War Center at Historic Tredegar. Marker is at or near this postal address: 500 Tredegar Street, Richmond VA 23219, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers
Tredegar Office Building image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, November 3, 2009
2. Tredegar Office Building
are within walking distance of this marker. The Gun Foundry (a few steps from this marker); The Cupola Furnace and Foundry (a few steps from this marker); The Tredegar Iron Works (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Tredegar Iron Works (within shouting distance of this marker); Toledo 1000-ton Press (within shouting distance of this marker); Civil War Visitor Center (within shouting distance of this marker); Joseph Reid Anderson (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Tredegar Iron Works (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Richmond.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left are advertisements for the various enterprises described. The caption reads, “In the mid-nineteenth century, skilled workers and Anderson family members were brought in as partners in different parts of the production process, forming separate companies and partnerships. Mathew Delaney was a skilled iron worker and partner in the locomotive shops. Dr. Robert Archer, Joseph Reid Andersonís father-in-law, ran the Armory rolling mill, as well as a separate tool works on the site.”

On the upper right is a photograph of “Francis Glasgow at his desk, c. 1914-18.”

On the lower right is a photograph carrying the
Tredegar Office Building and Gun Foundry image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, November 3, 2009
3. Tredegar Office Building and Gun Foundry
captions, “By the early 20th century, the company management included many family members, perhaps a way to spread profits among family members, and a few skilled workers who had moved through the ranks.” and “This picture taken at the office building includes Archer Anderson, the son of founder Joseph Reid Anderson, and Francis Glasgow, superintendent of the rolling mills and the father of noted novelist Ellen Glasgow.”
 
Also see . . .
1. The American Civil War Center at Historic Tredegar. (Submitted on November 6, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
2. Civil War Visitor Center at Tredegar Iron Works. Richmond National Battlefield Park (Submitted on November 6, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. 20th CenturyIndustry & Commerce
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 6, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 674 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 6, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.
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