Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Richmond, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Rutherfoord’s Mill

 
 
Rutherfoord’s Mill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, November 3, 2009
1. Rutherfoord’s Mill Marker
Inscription. Thomas Rutherfoord, a Scottish immigrant, built a flour mill on this site around 1800, using water power from the James River and Kanawha Canal. The ruins of the stone foundation can still be seen. Grain milling was the earliest industrial use of the Tredegar site, and was critical to Richmond’s development as an industrial city that was home to the largest flour milling operations in the world. In 1812, Edward Cunningham purchased Rutherfoord’s mill.
 
Location. 37° 32.163′ N, 77° 26.754′ W. Marker is in Richmond, Virginia. Marker can be reached from Tredegar Street 0.1 miles west of South 5th Street. Touch for map. This marker is located outside the Civil War Visitor Center at Tredegar Iron Works. Marker is at or near this postal address: 500 Tredegar Street, Richmond VA 23219, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Cupolas from the Virginia State Penitentiary (here, next to this marker); Tredegar Spike Mill (a few steps from this marker); Raceways (within shouting distance of this marker); Rail Lines at Tredegar (within shouting distance of this marker); The Richmond-Petersburg Railroad Bridge
Rutherfoord’s Mill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, November 3, 2009
2. Rutherfoord’s Mill Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Worker Housing (within shouting distance of this marker); Company Store (within shouting distance of this marker); The Canal and the Civil War (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Richmond.
 
More about this marker. On the left of the panel are a watercolor of the mill and a sketch of coopers making barrels. The caption reads, “The flour mill was only one of several buildings built by Rutherfoord before the Civil War. A corn mill, a cooper’s shop for barrel making, and granaries for storage before milling were built in this vicinity. The quantities of grain produced far surpassed tobacco in the early 1800s, requiring a rapid expansion in transportation, storage, and milling facilities.”

On the upper right is a portrait of Thomas Rutherfoord.

On the right is a drawing of the canal carrying the caption, “The James River and Kanawha Canal not only provided water power for Rutherfoord’s Mill, but also was the conduit for transporting grains from western Virginia.”

On the bottom is a period photograph of the spike mill carrying the caption, “By the 1840s, milling operations had stopped in the flour mill. The Tredegar Iron Works built a spike mill on the earlier foundations in 1859, seen in many photographs taken after the Civil War. Tredegar still used water power from the canal, but made many products for the canal’s direct competitor – railroads.”
 
Also see . . .
1. Thomas Rutherfoord. Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM (Submitted on November 7, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 

2. Civil War Visitor Center at Tredegar Iron Works. National Park Service (Submitted on November 7, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 

3. The American Civil War Center at Historic Tredegar. (Submitted on November 7, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
 
Categories. AgricultureAntebellum South, USIndustry & CommerceRailroads & StreetcarsWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 7, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 651 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 7, 2009, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.
Paid Advertisement