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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New York in New York County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Federal Hall National Memorial

Exploring Downtown

 
 
Federal Hall National Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 4, 2009
1. Federal Hall National Memorial Marker
Inscription. A majestic statue of George Washington stands on the front steps of Federal Hall in memory of Washington’s inauguration as the country’s first president – which happened on this spot on April 30th, 1789. The current building is named for the original Federal Hall, perhaps the most historic site in the entire country, where more than two centuries ago American democracy was born. From 1785 to 1790, New York served as the first capital of the brand-new United States of America. It was in Federal Hall that Congress met for the first time, adopted the Bill of Rights, and created the Departments of State, War and Treasury, and the United States Supreme Court. Today, Federal Hall serves as a museum operated by the National Park Service.
 
Erected by The Alliance for Downtown New York, Inc.
 
Location. 40° 42.413′ N, 74° 0.607′ W. Marker is in New York, New York, in New York County. Marker is at the intersection of Wall Street and Broad Street, on the left when traveling east on Wall Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 26 Wall Street, New York NY 10005, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Federal Hall National Monument (here, next to this marker); 40 Wall Street
Marker on Wall Street image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 4, 2009
2. Marker on Wall Street
(within shouting distance of this marker); On this site in Federal Hall (within shouting distance of this marker); Ohio Company of Associates (within shouting distance of this marker); City Hall to U.S.Capitol / Money Men / Nassau Changes Scale (within shouting distance of this marker); J.P. Morgan Building (within shouting distance of this marker); J. P. Morgan (within shouting distance of this marker); 1 Wall Street / 14 Wall Street (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New York.
 
More about this marker. The top of the marker contains a picture of George Washington taking the oath of office at Federal Hall. Below this is a picture of the Bill of Rights, with a caption of “The Bill of Rights – the collective name for the first 10 amendments to the United States Constitution, and one of the most important documents in the history of American democracy, guaranteeing such basic freedoms as press, speech, and religion – was passed by Congress meeting at Federal Hall in September 1789. The bottom of the marker
Federal Hall National Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 4, 2009
3. Federal Hall National Memorial Marker
Historic Trinity Church can be seen beyond the marker, at the end of Wall Street.
features pictures of the Pantheon, Rome, Italy, built 120-124 A.D., and the Parthenon, Athens, Greece, built 447-438 B.C. They have a caption of “Today’s Federal Hall, built 1833-42 as the city’s Custom House, is one of the few Wall Street buildings surviving from a time when the street was lined with new American banks pretending to be old Greek temples. Outside, its row of Parthenon-inspired columns suggests a reverence for Greek democracy; inside, its Pantheon-like dome brings to mind the economic power of the Roman empire – neatly summarizing two dominant 19th-century American ideals.”
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Take a tour of the markers in lower Manhattan erected by the Alliance for Downtown New York, Inc.
 
Also see . . .
1. Federal Hall. National Park Service website. (Submitted on November 8, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Federal Hall. Earliest Continental Congress; Washington Inauguration; Home of the Bill of Rights. New York Freedom Trail website. (Submitted on November 8, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

3. "Washinton Inauguration". Courtesy: schooltube.com and Pleasant Valley Middle School. (Submitted on April 14, 2011.) 
 
Categories. GovernmentNotable BuildingsNotable Events
 
Federal Hall National Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Volker Schmidt, May 2010
4. Federal Hall National Memorial
Federal Hall National Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 4, 2009
5. Federal Hall National Memorial
The statue of George Washington and Greek columns of Federal Hall are seen here behind the marker.
George Washington Statue image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 4, 2009
6. George Washington Statue
Federal Hall Inaugural Stone image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 4, 2009
7. Federal Hall Inaugural Stone
Standing on this stone
in the balcony of Federal Hall
April 30, 1789
George Washington
took the Oath
as the first President
of the
United States of America.
Washington's Bible image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, November 4, 2009
8. Washington's Bible
Bible used by George Washington during his Inauguration at Federal Hall in 1789.

Printed in 1767, it has also been used during the Inaugurations of President Harding in 1921, President Eisenhower in 1953, President Jimmy Carter in 1977, and President George Bush Sr. [sic] in 1989.

The Bible is owned by St. John's Lodge No. 1 and is on loan to the National Park Service. It can be seen inside Federal Hall.
Federal Hall National Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Volker Schmidt, May 2010
9. Federal Hall National Memorial
On this site in Federal Hall April 30, 1789 George Washington took the Oath as the first President of the United States of America
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 8, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,336 times since then and 119 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 8, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4. submitted on April 30, 2011, by Volker Schmidt of Albstadt, Germany.   5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on November 8, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   9. submitted on April 30, 2011, by Volker Schmidt of Albstadt, Germany.
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