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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Summerton in Clarendon County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Fort Watson

 
 
Fort Watson Stone Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, October 23, 2009
1. Fort Watson Stone Marker
Inscription. One of the chain of British posts in South Carolina. Located on this Indian Mound. Besieged April 15-23, 1781 by use of Maham's tower, Francis Marion forced the British to surrender and secured for his men badly needed ammunition and supplies.
 
Erected 1950 by the State of South Carolina and the South Carolina Daughters of the American Revoluion.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 33° 32.339′ N, 80° 26.206′ W. Marker is in Summerton, South Carolina, in Clarendon County. Marker is on Fort Watson Road (State Highway 14-803), in the median. Touch for map. Located at the pavements end. Marker is in this post office area: Summerton SC 29148, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Santee National Wildlife Refuge (a few steps from this marker); Swamp Fox (approx. half a mile away); 2nd Battle of Fort Watson (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named Fort Watson (approx. half a mile away); Fort Watson: (approx. 0.8 miles away); Liberty Hill Church / Pioneers in Desegregation
Fort Watson Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, October 11, 2009
2. Fort Watson Marker
(approx. 4.5 miles away); Anne Custis Burgess (approx. 6.6 miles away); "Together Let Us Sweetly Live" (approx. 6.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Summerton.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation & Tourism. Santee Indian Mound and Fort Watson Site (Submitted on November 10, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. National Register Properties in South Carolina, Santee Indian Mound and Fort Watson. Santee Indian Mound was part of a mound village complex; it was probably a burial and/or temple mound, likely constructed in some cultural period between 1200-1500 AD. Santee Indian Mound and a probable low earthwork remain intact except for the superposition of eighteenth-century fortifications on top of the mound. The fortification, British Revolutionary War post Fort Watson, was built from 30 to 50 feet high atop the mound.
In 1780, Francis Marion and Light Horse Harry Lee decided to capture the fort. Bombardment was out of the question, for the Americans were without artillery, but Colonel Maham, one of Marionís officers, proposed building a log tower higher than Fort Watson. Hidden by trees, men hewed logs and the tower
Fort Watson was built atop this Indian Burial Mound image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, October 23, 2009
3. Fort Watson was built atop this Indian Burial Mound
was erected in a single night. At dawn a shower of lead poured down into the enemy enclosure, effecting a quick victory. Fort Watson was the first fortified British military outpost in South Carolina recaptured by patriot forces after the British occupation of 1780.
There are no remains of Fort Watson on the site. Listed in the National Register July 29, 1969. (Submitted on November 13, 2009.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Maham Tower image. Click for full size.
By N.p.s., May 21, 2006
4. Maham Tower
It is named after Lt Col. Hezekiah Maham, one of Francis Marion's men who first developed the idea at Fort Watson early in the War.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 10, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,334 times since then and 83 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 10, 2009, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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