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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Brewster in Putnam County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Borden Bridge

 
 
The Borden Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
1. The Borden Bridge Marker
Inscription. Across this bridge, during the Civil War, Gail Borden Jr.ís New York Condensed Milk Company shipped condensed milk to the Union Troops.
 
Location. 41° 23.69′ N, 73° 36.434′ W. Marker is in Brewster, New York, in Putnam County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street (U.S. 6) and Peaceable Hill Road, on the left when traveling east on Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Brewster NY 10509, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Brewster Veterans Memorial (approx. half a mile away); Brewster Soldiers Monument (approx. 0.7 miles away); Birthplace of Darius M. Couch (approx. 1.2 miles away); Drewsclift Cemetery (approx. 1.6 miles away); Old Southeast Cemetery (approx. 2.7 miles away); Hopkins Corners (approx. 2.9 miles away); Chancellor Kent (approx. 3.1 miles away); Gilead Cemetery (approx. 3.5 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Brewster.
 
Regarding The Borden Bridge. In 1864, Gail Borden constructed a milk condensery at the juncture of Routes 6 & 22. The New York Milk Condensery was the largest and most advanced milk factory at that time.
A model of cleanliness and efficiency, it was Borden's first commercially
The Borden Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
2. The Borden Bridge Marker
successful plant. Demand for condensed milk was high due to the Civil War, and over 200 dairy farmers supplied 20,000 gallons of milk each day.

In 1879, the plant expanded and a new brick structure was erected around the existing wood building. Construction occurred while the plant continued its operations in the older structure.
The Borden factory flourished for over fifty years. Following construction of the Croton Reservoir System, which flooded much of the area's viable farmland early in the twentieth century, production at the plant ceased.

In 1935, the building was ravaged by fire. Today, only part of the main factory building and a small outbuilding remain of what was once one of Brewster's most important industries.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWar, US Civil
 
The Borden Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 10, 2012
3. The Borden Bridge Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 14, 2009, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 865 times since then and 38 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 14, 2009, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.   3. submitted on May 7, 2012, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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