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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cincinnati in Hamilton County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Black Brigade of Cincinnati

 
 
The Black Brigade of Cincinnati Marker (Side A) image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 31, 2009
1. The Black Brigade of Cincinnati Marker (Side A)
Inscription.
Side A:
Following the success of Confederate forces in eastern Kentucky and General John Hunt Morgan's raids there in 1862, Cincinnatians believed that Southern invasion was imminent. Anxious officials ordered Cincinnati citizens to form home guards, but black men willing to volunteer were rebuffed when they attempted to join a defense force. Instead, police serving as provost guards rounded up many and marched them by bayonet to build fortifications in Kentucky. Reacting to the shameful treatment of the blacks eager to support the Union, the commander of the Department of Ohio dispatched Major General Lewis Wallace to command the civilians and to liberate black men forced into service.
(Continued on other side)

Side B:
(Continued from other side)
Judge William Martin Dickson, who favored enlisting black soldiers in the Union Army, assumed command of the brigade, composed of 1,000 African American volunteers determined to fight to end slavery. From September 2-20, they cleared forests and built military roads, rifle pits, and fortifications. Receiving deserved praise for their labor, the unit disbanded when the Confederate forces no longer imperiled the city. Members of the Cincinnati Black Brigade, first black unit with military purpose in the Civil War, later fought with the 127th Ohio
The Black Brigade of Cincinnati Marker (Side B) image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., http://ohs
2. The Black Brigade of Cincinnati Marker (Side B)
Voluntary Infantry and other black regiments.
 
Erected 2003 by Ohio Bicentennial Commission, The P & G Fund, and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 58-31.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 39° 6.005′ N, 84° 29.914′ W. Marker is in Cincinnati, Ohio, in Hamilton County. Touch for map. Marker is along the Ohio River in Sawyer Point Park, about 110 feet ESE of the Cincinnatus statue, and about 180 feet east of the Newport Southbank pedestrian bridge (former Louisville & Nashville Railroad bridge). Marker is at or near this postal address: 801 East Pete Rose Way, Cincinnati OH 45202, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Cincinnati's German Heritage (a few steps from this marker); The Sultana (a few steps from this marker); The Irish in Cincinnati (a few steps from this marker); 1749 French Claims to Ohio River Valley (a few steps from this marker); Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus (within shouting distance of this marker); Bicentennial Commons at Sawyer Point
The Black Brigade of Cincinnati Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 31, 2009
3. The Black Brigade of Cincinnati Marker
At foreground left of photo.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Corporal Merrill Laws Ricketts Marine Corps Memorial (approx. mile away); Robert S. Duncanson (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cincinnati.
 
Also see . . .
1. Black Brigade of Cincinnati. (Submitted on November 16, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. National Colors of the Black Brigade of Cincinnati. (Submitted on November 16, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil RightsWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 16, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 1,395 times since then and 70 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 16, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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