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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Katonah in Westchester County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Welcome to John Jay Homestead

State Historic Site

 
 
Welcome to John Jay Homestead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
1. Welcome to John Jay Homestead Marker
Inscription. In 1801, after a distinguished career in public service, John Jay retired to Bedford where until his death in 1829, he enjoyed spending time with his family and improving his farm. Four succeeding generations of the Jay family resided here until 1953, creating a comfortable home and profitable farm.
A one-mile, self-guided walking tour of the property begins here. It takes about one hour to cover its circular route. Follow the path indicated on the map to your right to learn about the Jay’s farm, its buildings, and history.
 
Erected by Friends of the Jay Homestead. (Marker Number 1.)
 
Location. 41° 15.043′ N, 73° 39.557′ W. Marker is in Katonah, New York, in Westchester County. Marker can be reached from Jay Street (New York State Route 22) 0.1 miles from Beaver Dam Road, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Located on the grounds of the John Jay Homestead. Marker is at or near this postal address: 400 Route 22, Katonah NY 10536, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. John Jay Homestead (here, next to this marker); The Homestead Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); The Sundial and Fountain Gardens
William Jay 1841 – 1915 image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
2. William Jay 1841 – 1915
[ detail from the marker ]
William Jay II, known as the “Colonel” for his service in the Civil War, graduated from Columbia law school and served on the board of several New York City organizations. William Jay II summered here, played polo, bred hackney horses, and founded the popular New York Coaching Club.
(within shouting distance of this marker); The Glasshouse Complex and Herb Garden (within shouting distance of this marker); The John Jay Potting Sheds (within shouting distance of this marker); Bedford House (within shouting distance of this marker); The Beech Allee (Avenue) and Stone Fences (within shouting distance of this marker); The Brick Lot (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Katonah.
 
Also see . . .
1. The John Jay Homestead. During twenty-seven years of service to his state and nation, John Jay looked forward to the day when he would retire with his wife and family to "the house on my farm in Westchester County…." The land his farm occupied was purchased from the Native American sachem, Katonah, in 1703, by Jay's maternal grandfather, Jacobus Van Cortlandt. (Submitted on November 21, 2009.) 

2. John Jay Homestead State Historic Site. Wikipedia article on the John Jay Homestead. (Submitted on November 22, 2009, by Jeff Conner of Norfolk, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Notable PersonsSettlements & Settlers
 
Welcome to John Jay Homestead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 14, 2009
3. Welcome to John Jay Homestead Marker
The marker is next to the gate. The Main House is in the background.
John Jay 1745 – 1829 image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
4. John Jay 1745 – 1829
[ detail from the marker ]
John Jay served as President of the Continental Congress, Minister to Spain, and Secretary for Foreign Affairs. He was an author and a key negotiator of the Treaty of Paris that ended the Revolutionary War, and was appointed first Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court by President George Washington. Jay was also principal author of the first state constitution for New York and served as its second governor.
Portrait by Gilbert Stuart.
William Jay 1789 – 1858 image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
5. William Jay 1789 – 1858
[ detail from the marker ]
William Jay, John Jay’s son, graduated from Yale College in 1808. After a short career as a lawyer, he returned to Bedford where he served as a Westchester County judge for 30 years while managing his father’s Bedford farm. He was an internationally recognized force in the abolitionist movement.
Portrait by Henry Wenzler.
John Jay 1817 – 1894 image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
6. John Jay 1817 – 1894
[ detail from the marker ]
John Jay II, William’s son, distinguished himself as an attorney and as a minister to Austria. He was a founder and leader of many New York City social clubs and cultural institutions. John Jay II spent his summers here in Bedford.
Eleanor Jay 1882 – 1953 image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
7. Eleanor Jay 1882 – 1953
[ detail from the marker ]
Eleanor Jay Iselin was the last Jay to own the family farm. She spent most of her life here and enjoyed riding, playing golf, and socializing with friends. Her interest in preserving the family’s home and farm was realized in 1958 when her Bedford home became a New York State Historic Site.
John Jay image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 31, 2014
8. John Jay
This 1794 portrait of John Jay by Gilbert Stuart hangs in the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 21, 2009, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 698 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on November 21, 2009, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut.   8. submitted on March 27, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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