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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Rock Hill in York County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The CCC in York County / Tom Johnston Camp, (SCS#10), CCC

 
 
The CCC in York County Face of Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, November 25, 2009
1. The CCC in York County Face of Marker
Inscription.
The CCC in York County
One of the most successful of Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal programs was the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), created in 1933. It gave many young men and World War veterans jobs planting trees, fighting forest fires and soil erosion, and building state and national parks. Almost 50,000 men served in S.C. between 1933 and 1942. York County included three CCC camps: Kings Mountain, York, and here at Ebenezer.
Tom Johnston Camp, (SCS#10), CCC
Young men, most of them between 17 and 25, lived in camps commanded by U.S. Army officers. The CCC camp here, described as "a busy little city," was named for Thomas L. Johnston, Rock Hill banker and farmer. It opened on August 19, 1935 and specialized in soil conservation. Its 250 men also participated in many educational, vocational, and recreational activities as well. The camp closed on July 27, 1942.
 
Erected 2005 by Rock Hill Civitans and the York County Culture and Heritage Museums. (Marker Number 46-35.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Civilian Conservation Corps marker series.
 
Location. 34° 57.372′ N, 81° 3.12′ W. Marker is in Rock Hill, South
Tom Johnston Camp Face of Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, November 25, 2009
2. Tom Johnston Camp Face of Marker
Reverse side
Carolina, in York County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of South Herlong Avenue and Piedmont Boulevard, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 222 South Herlong Avenue, Rock Hill SC 29732, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Ebenezer (approx. 0.3 miles away); Town of Ebenezer (approx. 0.7 miles away); Ebenezer Confederate Memorial (approx. 0.7 miles away); First Home of Winthrop College (approx. 1.5 miles away); Columbia Seminary Chapel (approx. 1.6 miles away); McCorkle-Fewell-Long House / Oakland (approx. 1.9 miles away); President's House (approx. 1.9 miles away); Jefferson Davis' Flight (approx. 1.9 miles away); Rock Hill Printing and Finishing Company / Rock Hill Buggy Company and Anderson Motor Company (approx. 2.1 miles away); Rock Hill Buggy Company / Anderson Motor Company (approx. 2.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Rock Hill.
 
More about this marker. Marker is in front of Piedmont Medical Centerís front entrance and is not easily seen from the roadway.
 
Also see . . .
1. Civilian Conservation Corps. The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was a public work relief program for unemployed men, providing vocational training through the performance
The CCC in York County / Tom Johnston Camp, (SCS#10), CCC Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, November 25, 2009
3. The CCC in York County / Tom Johnston Camp, (SCS#10), CCC Marker
of useful work related to conservation and development of natural resources in the United States from 1933 to 1942. (Submitted on January 30, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Kings Mountain State Park. A big, hilly, woodsy park with lots to do, Kings Mountain State Park has been a regional favorite for generations. (Submitted on January 30, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. 20th CenturyNotable Places
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 25, 2009, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 984 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 25, 2009, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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