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Richmond in Henrico County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Black Troops Attack at Chaffin’s Farm

Fort Gilmer – 1864

 
 
Black Troops Attack at Chaffin’s Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
1. Black Troops Attack at Chaffin’s Farm Marker
Inscription. Confederate Fort Gilmer loomed as a major obstacle to any advance on Richmond. On the afternoon of September 29, 1864, several regiments of black troops stormed these works only to be driven back. A portion of the 7th United States Colored Troops, which was their official army designation, made the last of three bloody assaults and managed to reach the deep moat outside the fort’s outer wall. Nearly the entire command was killed, wounded, or captured.

The fighting here was just one of several Union attacks that day which became known as the battles of Chaffin’s Farm. Despite success at New Market Heights and Fort Harrison, the arrival of southern reinforcements, personally led by General R. E. Lee, slammed the door shut to any further march against Richmond.
 
Erected by Richmond National Battlefield Park - National Park Service.
 
Location. This marker has been replaced by another marker nearby. 37° 26.83′ N, 77° 22.815′ W. Marker is in Richmond, Virginia, in Henrico County. Marker is on Battlefield Park Road, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in the Fort Gilmer Unit of the Richmond National Battlefield Park. Marker is in this post office area: Henrico VA 23231, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8
Marker at Fort Gilmer image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
2. Marker at Fort Gilmer
other markers are within walking distance of this location. Hopeless Attacks (a few steps from this marker); Fort Gilmer (within shouting distance of this marker); Richmond Defences (approx. ¼ mile away); a different marker also named Fort Gilmer (approx. 0.7 miles away); Fort Harrison (approx. 0.7 miles away); First Successful Colonial Tobacco Crop (approx. ¾ mile away); Fort Johnson (approx. 0.8 miles away); Advancing On Richmond (approx. 0.8 miles away).
 
More about this marker. The right of the marker features a picture of the attack on Fort Gilmer. It has the caption “A Confederate artilleryman volunteered the following account: ‘Those fellows fought well, sir. They came up at the double quick … and leaped into the ditch. Our men threw hand-grenades among them, and these assisted in killing them.’ ” The left of the marker contains a war-time photograph with the caption “Lt. Charles Teeple and this unidentified black enlisted man served in the 7th USCT. More than 6,000 African American soldiers participated in the battles of Fort Gilmer, New Market Heights, and Fort Harrison.”
 
Regarding Black Troops Attack at Chaffin’s Farm. This marker was replaced by a new one named Hopeless Attacks (See nearby markers).
 
Also see . . .
Fortifications at Fort Gilmer image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
3. Fortifications at Fort Gilmer
These well-preserved earthworks are located in front of the marker.

1. Battlefield Tour - Ft Gilmer to Ft Brady. Richmond National Battlefield Park website. (Submitted on January 6, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Battle of Chaffin's Farm. (Submitted on November 25, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. General Benjamin F. Butler.
 
Categories. African AmericansForts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Richmond National Battlefield Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 24, 2007
4. Richmond National Battlefield Park
Marker is in the Fort Gilmer Unit of the Richmond National Battlefield Park.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on January 6, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,115 times since then and 56 times this year. Last updated on November 25, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 6, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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