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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Alabaster in Shelby County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Harless Cemetery

 
 
Harless Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, November 27, 2009
1. Harless Cemetery Marker
Inscription. Harless Cemetery was established as a burying ground in the early 1800s. It is on land homesteaded by Henry Harless, Jr., that was later owned and subsequently deeded to the cemetery by members of the Wyatt family. The oldest surviving marker is for Henry Harless, Jr.'s sister, Hannah Harless Wilson (1783-1833). Hannah and her husband, Benjamin Wilson, arrived to this area about 1814 and are believed to be the first white settlers to the Ebenezer community. The cemetery is sometimes referred to as Ebenezer Cemetery because of its proximity and connections with nearby Ebenezer United Methodist Church, established in 1818. Most of those buried here can be linked by blood or marriage and their lives tell the history of the area. Among those buried in this hallowed ground are descendants of American Revolutionary War Patriots, as well as veterans from five wars of the 1800s and 1900s: the Civil War, World War I and II, and the Korean and Vietnam Wars.

Listed in the Alabama Historic Cemetery Register
 
Erected 2009 by Alabama Historical Commission / The Harless Cemetery Association.
 
Location. 33° 10.11′ N, 86° 48.36′ W. Marker is near Alabaster, Alabama, in Shelby County. Marker is on County Road 24, on
Harless Cemetery & Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, November 27, 2009
2. Harless Cemetery & Marker
the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Alabaster AL 35007, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Washington Hall/Birth of A Nation (approx. 2.3 miles away); The President's Oval Office/The Glorious Burden (approx. 2.3 miles away); The Lucille Ryals Thompson Colonial Chapel/One Nation Under God (approx. 2.4 miles away); The Colonial Courthouse/The Stocks and Pillory (approx. 2.4 miles away); The Liberty Bell (approx. 2.4 miles away); The Liberty Bell Garden (approx. 2.4 miles away); Nabors Cemetery (approx. 3.1 miles away); Benton Family Cemetery (approx. 3.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Alabaster.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesChurches, Etc.Settlements & SettlersWar, KoreanWar, US CivilWar, VietnamWar, World IWar, World II
 
Harless Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, November 27, 2009
3. Harless Cemetery Marker
Hannah Wilson Gravestone (1783-1833) image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, November 27, 2009
4. Hannah Wilson Gravestone (1783-1833)
Benjamin Wilson Gravestone (1773-1852) image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, November 27, 2009
5. Benjamin Wilson Gravestone (1773-1852)
Civil War Veteran Gravestone image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, November 27, 2009
6. Civil War Veteran Gravestone
James L. Butler Sgt Co I 7 Regt Ala Cav Confederate States Army
World War I Veteran Gravestone image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, November 27, 2009
7. World War I Veteran Gravestone
James Ottis Mink Alabama Pvt US Army World War I June 17, 1896 May 20, 1972
World War II Veteran Gravestone image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, November 27, 2009
8. World War II Veteran Gravestone
Reginal Carl Bolton US Army World War II May 1, 1926 Dec 29, 2004 Purple Heart General Patton's Third Army
Ebenezer United Methodist Church Est. 1818 image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, November 27, 2009
9. Ebenezer United Methodist Church Est. 1818
The church is located about half mile south of the cemetery. Go to second dirt road and turn right, the church is located at the end of the dirt road.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 27, 2009, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 2,160 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 27, 2009, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.   3. submitted on November 28, 2009, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.   4, 5. submitted on November 27, 2009, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.   6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on November 28, 2009, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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