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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cincinnati in Hamilton County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

George Washington Williams

 
 
George Washington Williams Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 31, 2009
1. George Washington Williams Marker
Inscription.
George Washington Williams was born in 1849 in Bedford, Pennsylvania. At age 14, he enlisted in the Union Army to fight in the Civil War and received a medical discharge in 1868. In 1874, he became the first African American to graduate from the Newton Theological Institution in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and shortly after married Sarah A. Sterrett. He became pastor of the Twelfth Baptist Church in Boston before moving to Washington, D.C. to serve as editor of a newspaper called The Commoner. He then moved to Cincinnati to become pastor of the Union Baptist Church and while there served as the first black member of the Ohio Legislature from 1879-1881. Williams went to the Belgian Congo in 1890 where he criticized King Leopold II in an Open Letter for his inhumane policies in the Congo. He died in 1891 in England.
 
Erected 2003 by The Ohio Bicentennial Commission, Historic Preservation Committee, Union Baptist Church and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 52-31.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 39° 6.15′ N, 84° 31.234′ W. Marker is in Cincinnati, Ohio, in Hamilton County
George Washington Williams Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 31, 2009
2. George Washington Williams Marker
At Union Baptist Church.
. Marker is at the intersection of 7th Street and Central Avenue (U.S. 22), on the right when traveling east on 7th Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 405 W. 7th Street, Cincinnati OH 45203, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Rabbi Isaac Mayer Wise and the Plum Street Temple (about 800 feet away, measured in a direct line); First National Correctional Congress / Declaration of Principles of 1870 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Cincinnati Fire Fighters (approx. 0.2 miles away); Gaines High School / Peter H. Clark (approx. 0.2 miles away); Wiltsee Undertaker (approx. 0.3 miles away); Fuldner Mortuary (approx. 0.3 miles away); Greek Revival Architecture Example (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Betts House, 1804 (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cincinnati.
 
Also see . . .
1. George Washington Williams. (Submitted on December 4, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. George Washington Williams: A Biography. by John Hope Franklin, published by the Duke University Press in 1998. (Submitted on December 5, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 
 
Additional keywords. Historian USCT United States Colored Troops
 
Categories. African AmericansChurches, Etc.CommunicationsNotable PersonsWar, US Civil
 
George Washington Williams, author image. Click for full size.
By Wikepedia
3. George Washington Williams, author
(from his History of Negro Troops)
Union Baptist Church Sign image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 31, 2009
4. Union Baptist Church Sign
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 4, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 2,613 times since then and 66 times this year. Last updated on December 5, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 4, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   3. submitted on December 5, 2009, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   4. submitted on December 4, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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