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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Washington in Wilkes County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Jefferson Davis

 
 
Jefferson Davis Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, November 15, 2009
1. Jefferson Davis Marker
Inscription.
On May 4, 1865, Jefferson Davis arrived in Washington where he performed what proved to be his last duties as President of the Confederate States of America. Shortly thereafter, with a small staff and escort, he departed enroute to the trans-Mississippi Department where, undaunted by the tragic surrenders at Appomattox and Durham Station, he intended to unite the forces of Generals E. Kirby Smith, Taylor, Forrest, Maury and Magruder “to form an army, which in the portion of that country abounding in supplies, and deficient in rivers and railroads, could have continued the war until our enemy, foiled in the purpose of subjugation, should in accordance with his repeated declaration, have agreed, on the basis of a return to the Union, to acknowledge the Constitutional rights of the States, and by a convention, or quasi-treaty, to guarantee the security of person and property.”

After a hard journey via Sandersville, Dublin and Abbeville, his party camped a mile north of Irwinville (178 miles SW), in the present Jefferson Davis Memorial State Park. At dawn on May 10th, his camp was surrounded by men of the 1st Wisconsin and 4th Michigan cavalry regiments [US], and the President of the Southern Confederacy became a “state prisoner,” his hopes for a new nation, in which each state would exercise without interference
Jefferson Davis Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 13, 2015
2. Jefferson Davis Marker
its cherished “Constitutional rights,” forever dead.
 
Erected 1957 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 157-12.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 33° 44.273′ N, 82° 44.347′ W. Marker is in Washington, Georgia, in Wilkes County. Marker is at the intersection of East Court Street and East Square, on the right when traveling west on East Court Street. Touch for map. The marker is located in front of the Wilkes County Courthouse. Marker is at or near this postal address: 23 East Court Street, Washington GA 30673, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Bolton Factory (here, next to this marker); Wilkes County (a few steps from this marker); Washington-Wilkes Vietnam Monument (a few steps from this marker); Woodmen of the World Supreme Sacrifice Monument (a few steps from this marker); Washington, Wilkes County, Georgia (a few steps from this marker); The Dissolution of the Confederate Government (a few steps from this marker); Last Cabinet Meeting of the C.S.A.
Jefferson Davis Marker<br>Wilkes County Courthouse in Background image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 13, 2015
3. Jefferson Davis Marker
Wilkes County Courthouse in Background
(a few steps from this marker); Last Cabinet Meeting (within shouting distance of this marker); Wilkes County Confederate Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Wilkes County Courthouses (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Washington.
 
More about this marker. Jefferson Davis held the last Cabinet meeting of the Confederacy in the Bank of the State of Georgia building, which stood on this site. That building was torn down in 1903, replaced by the present Courthouse.
 
Regarding Jefferson Davis. Rumors remain that at least one chest of the Lost Gold of the Confederacy is still hidden in the Washington area. Much of the gold was recovered in Chenault, less than 20 miles from Washington.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Jefferson Davis Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, November 15, 2009
4. Jefferson Davis Marker
The Wilkes County Counthouse: the marker can just be seen directly below the clock
The Wilkes County Courthouse image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, November 15, 2009
5. The Wilkes County Courthouse
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 14, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 925 times since then and 47 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on December 14, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   2, 3. submitted on March 29, 2016, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4, 5. submitted on December 14, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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