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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Austin in Travis County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The Texas Capitol

 
 
The Texas Capitol Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, September 3, 2007
1. The Texas Capitol Marker
Inscription. Austin became the Capital of Texas Jan. 19, 1840, and this hill was platted as Capitol Square. A modest statehouse built here in the 1850s soon developed structural flaws. The Constitutional Convention of 1876 set aside about 3,000,000 acres of public land to finance another building. This was authorized after the 1850s Capitol burned on Nov. 9, 1881.

Architect E.E. Myers of Detroit won a national competition with his plans for this Capitol. The contractor was Mattheas Schnell of Rock Island, Ill. Basement excavation began early in 1882. Railroads built especially for this project hauled limestone from the Oatmanville Quarries in Travis County as well as stone donated by the owners of the Granite Mountain in Burnet County. The 900 workmen on the project included 86 granite cutters brought from Scotland. Charles B. and John V. Farwell, Chicago bankers, funded the construction and were repaid in land in ten Panhandle counties, on which they founded the famous XIT Ranch. At dedication ceremonies on May 18, 1888, the Capitol was accepted on behalf of the people by State Senator Temple Houston, son of Texas hero Sam Houston. He called it “a structure that shall stand as a sentinel of eternity”.
 
Erected 1976 by the Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 14568.)
 
Location.
The Texas Capitol image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, September 3, 2007
2. The Texas Capitol
30° 16.362′ N, 97° 44.46′ W. Marker is in Austin, Texas, in Travis County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of 11th St and Congress Ave. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Austin TX 78701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Confederate Texas Legislatures (here, next to this marker); Tyler Rose (here, next to this marker); The Woman Suffrage Movement in Texas (here, next to this marker); African Americans in the Texas Revolution (here, next to this marker); Governor Edmund Jackson Davis (here, next to this marker); Governor James Edward Ferguson August 31, 1871 -September 21, 1944 (here, next to this marker); Governor Andrew Jackson Hamilton (here, next to this marker); Governor Elisha Marshall Pease (here, next to this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Austin.
 
Also see . . .  Texas State Capitol from Wikipedia. (Submitted on December 26, 2009, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
 
Categories. GovernmentNotable Buildings
 
The Texas Capitol image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, September 30, 2007
3. The Texas Capitol
Viewing of the interior dome
The Texas Capitol, north side image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, May 26, 1996
4. The Texas Capitol, north side
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 7, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 20, 2009, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas. This page has been viewed 888 times since then and 59 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on December 20, 2009, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas.   3. submitted on February 11, 2010, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas.   4. submitted on April 11, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. A wide view photo of the marker and the surrounding area in context. • Can you help?
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