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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Winchester, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Sheridan’s Headquarters

 
 
Sheridan's Headquarters Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 26, 2007
1. Sheridan's Headquarters Marker
Inscription. 1861 hdqts. for Gen. R. H. Milroy. 1862 hdqts. for Gen. N.P. Banks who took the town for the first time. Was again used by Gen. Milroy in 1863. In the fall of 1864–1865 Gen. Sheridan used it as hdqts. Sheridan left here to rally his troops at the Battle of Ceder Creek on Oct. 19, 1864. After the war it became the Episcopal Female Institute.
 
Location. 39° 11.194′ N, 78° 9.986′ W. Marker is in Winchester, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of Braddock Street (U.S. 11) and Piccadilly Street, on the right when traveling south on Braddock Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 135 Braddock Street, Winchester VA 22601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. George Washington Lot (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); President William McKinley (about 500 feet away); Loyal Quaker and Brave Slave (about 600 feet away); Thomas, Sixth Lord Fairfax of Cameron (approx. 0.2 miles away); Catherine B. Conrad (approx. 0.2 miles away); Frederick County Courthouse (approx. 0.2 miles away); Colonel James Wood
Headquaters for Several Union Generals image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 26, 2007
2. Headquaters for Several Union Generals
The marker is slightly covered by shrubs on the left side of the entrance steps.
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Daniel Morgan House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Lord Fairfax (approx. 0.2 miles away); George Washington's Political Career Began on this Site (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Winchester.
 
Also see . . .  Sheridan's Ride. Mentioned on the marker, this was the start point for Sheridan's famous ride. The ride was later romanticized in poetry and painting. Stories run in Northern newspapers at the time raised morale and helped ensure Abraham Lincoln's re-election. (Submitted on September 23, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 23, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,598 times since then and 50 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on September 23, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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