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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Tampa in Hillsborough County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Victims of the Yellow Fever

 
 
Victims of the Yellow Fever Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2010
1. Victims of the Yellow Fever Marker
Inscription.
In Memory of the
Victims of the Yellow
Fever Epidemics of
1853, 1858, 1867, 1871
and 1887 - 88 who are
Buried in Oaklawn

 
Erected 1997 by Tampa Historical Society.
 
Location. 27° 57.265′ N, 82° 27.445′ W. Marker is in Tampa, Florida, in Hillsborough County. Marker can be reached from East Harrison Street near North Morgan Street. Touch for map. Located in the Oaklawn Cemetery, near the East Harrison Street entrance, along the walkway. Marker is in this post office area: Tampa FL 33602, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 29 Sea Captains and Mariners (here, next to this marker); Confederate States Soldiers and Sailors (here, next to this marker); Tampa Native Americans (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Brooke Mass Grave (within shouting distance of this marker); Kennedy (within shouting distance of this marker); U.S.S. Sagamore (within shouting distance of this marker); Oaklawn Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); Pioneer Priests' Graves (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tampa.
 
Regarding Victims of the Yellow Fever.
Victims of the Yellow Fever Marker, shares location with the 29 Sea Captains Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, January 9, 2010
2. Victims of the Yellow Fever Marker, shares location with the 29 Sea Captains Marker
Yellow Fever, Mass Grave; The second mass grave (in the cemetery)contains an undetermined number of yellow fever victims. Tampa, like many Southern coastal towns and cities, was seasonally assailed by this often-fatal form of tropical hemorrhagic fever, known throughout the South as “yellow jack,” or “bilious fever.” Tampa had five outbreaks between 1850 and 1905. The worst was 1887-1888 and – not knowing the cause of the illness – locals hastily buried victims en masse, hoping to stem contagion. Ironically a local doctor, John P. Wall (also buried at Oaklawn), was correct in suggesting that yellow fever was spread by the bite of the Aedes aegypti mosquito, but he was widely disbelieved.
(Historic Guides and the Tampa Historical Society)
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesNotable Events
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 19, 2017. This page originally submitted on February 9, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,582 times since then and 59 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 9, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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