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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

John Rutledge Home

 
 
John Rutledge Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, February 13, 2010
1. John Rutledge Home Marker
Inscription. This house, built before the American Revolution, was the residence of John Rutledge (1739-1800), first Governor of the State of South Carolina. He was President of South Carolina, 1776-78, and Governor, 1779-82, signer of the U. S. Constitution, 1787, Chief Justice of South Carolina 1791-95, and Chief Justice of the United States, 1795. The house was altered in 1853 by P. H. Hammarskold, who added the ornamental iron.
 
Erected 1973 by The Society Daughters of Colonial Wars in the State of South Carolina. (Marker Number 10-12.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 32° 46.578′ N, 79° 56.019′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is at the intersection of Broad Street and Orange Street, on the left when traveling east on Broad Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 116 Broad Street, Charleston SC 29401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Laurens - Rutledge House (a few steps from this marker); Site of St. Andrew's Hall (a few steps from this marker); The Most Reverend Emmet Michael Walsh
John Rutledge Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, February 13, 2010
2. John Rutledge Home Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); William Harvey House (within shouting distance of this marker); Home of Doctor John Lining (within shouting distance of this marker); Cathedral of St. John the Baptist (within shouting distance of this marker); Major Peter Bocquet's House (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); David Ramsay House (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charleston.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia entry for John Rutledge. (Submitted on February 13, 2010, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.)
2. South Carolina Department of Archives and History. (Submitted on February 13, 2010, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.)
 
Categories. Colonial EraGovernmentNotable BuildingsNotable PersonsPolitics
 
John Rutledge Home image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, February 13, 2010
3. John Rutledge Home
John Rutledge Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, February 13, 2010
4. John Rutledge Home Marker
Governor John Rutledge House
has been designated a
National Historic Landmark
This site possesses National significance in commemorating the history of the united States of America
1974
National Park Service United States Department of the Interior
John Rutledge image. Click for full size.
5. John Rutledge
John Rutledge Home National Register Building - #71000752 image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
6. John Rutledge Home National Register Building - #71000752
Center Medallion:
Award 1986
Carolopolis
Condita A.D.
1670
Preservation Society of Charleston
The Carolopolis Award is a plaque placed on buildings that have been preserved, restored, rehabilitated or are outstanding examples of new construction. The award is presented to those individuals, businesses or organizations that currently own the property. The Carolopolis Award is a slightly modified reproduction of the seal of the City of Charleston. The word Carolopolis comes from the original name of the city

Historic Hotels of America Plaque included National Trust of Historical Preservation
John Rutledge Home Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
7. John Rutledge Home Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 13, 2010, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 810 times since then and 48 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on February 13, 2010, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.   6, 7. submitted on October 4, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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