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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Site of St. Andrew's Hall

 
 
St. Andrew's Hall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, February 13, 2010
1. St. Andrew's Hall Marker
Inscription.
Site of the St. Andrew's Hall
Designed by Hugh Smith
for
the St. Andrew's Society of Charleston, S.C.
founded in 1729,
the oldest benevolent organization in the
State of South Carolina
corner stone laid July 4, 1814,
building destroyed by fire December 11, 1861.

Here such societies as the South Carolina Jockey Club, the St. Cecilia society, and the Hebrew Benevolent Association also held their meetings: Here President James Monroe and the Marquis de Lafayette were lodged as guest of the city; and here on December 20, 1860, was passed the South Carolina Ordinance of Secession.
 
Erected 1947 by St. Andrews Society of Charleston, S.C.
 
Location. 32° 46.578′ N, 79° 56.034′ W. Marker is in Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is at the intersection of Broad Street and Orange Street, on the left when traveling east on Broad Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Charleston SC 29401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. John Rutledge Home (a few steps from this marker); Laurens - Rutledge House (within shouting distance of this marker); The Most Reverend Emmet Michael Walsh
St. Andrew's Hall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
2. St. Andrew's Hall Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Cathedral of St. John the Baptist (within shouting distance of this marker); William Harvey House (within shouting distance of this marker); Home of Doctor John Lining (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Major Peter Bocquet's House (about 500 feet away); Electrical Engineering Milestone (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charleston.
 
Also see . . .
1. South Carolina Colony. Site contains a brief history of the state which includes a section on the Ordinance of Secession being signed in St. Andrews Hall. (Submitted on February 13, 2010, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.) 

2. St Andrews Society History. The St. Andrew’s Society of Charleston, South Carolina, founded in the year 1729, is not only the oldest, but it is also the progenitor of some, possibly a great number, of these St. Andrew’s societies. (Submitted on October 5, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

3. The St. Cecilia Society of Charleston, South Carolina. Many writers have labeled Charleston’s St. Cecilia Society the first musical society
St. Andrew's Hall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, February 13, 2010
3. St. Andrew's Hall Marker
in the United States, but it would be more accurate to describe it as the earliest known private subscription concert organization in North America. (Submitted on October 5, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

4. The Hebrew Benevolent Society, of Charleston, S. C,. The object of this Society is Benevolence. In that one emphatic, grateful word, are comprehended all the tender offices of Charity. (Submitted on October 5, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. GovernmentPoliticsWar, US Civil
 
Site of St. Andrew's Hall image. Click for full size.
By Michael Sean Nix, February 13, 2010
4. Site of St. Andrew's Hall
Old sketch of St. Andrew's Hall image. Click for full size.
5. Old sketch of St. Andrew's Hall
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 13, 2010, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,726 times since then and 240 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on February 13, 2010, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina.   2. submitted on October 5, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   3, 4, 5. submitted on February 13, 2010, by Michael Sean Nix of Spartanburg, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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