Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Greenville in Greenville County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Reedy River

Reedy River Falls Historic Park

 
 
The Reedy River Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 20, 2010
1. The Reedy River Marker
Inscription.
The Reedy River, named for the "reeds" which once grew close around its banks, flows from Traveler's Rest southward for almost sixty miles. In the middle of Greenville, it tumbles into steep, narrow falls, and then meanders toward Conestee before joining the Saluda River at Lake Greenwood. Its shoals and falls were a source of power for early settlers. Greenville's Main street is located at its shallow ford. Early water-powered industries clustered along the Reedy River: an ironworks, the Gower, Cox, and Markley Coach Factory (1835-1910), a sawmill, a paper-making factory, an armory, a grist and corn mills. Later, Greenvillians established textile and apparel mills along its banks.
 
Location. 34° 50.683′ N, 82° 24.067′ W. Marker is in Greenville, South Carolina, in Greenville County. Marker can be reached from South Main Street near East Camperdown Way. Touch for map. Marker is located on the grounds of Falls Park, north of the Liberty Bridge. Marker is in this post office area: Greenville SC 29601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Reedy River Falls (within shouting distance of this marker); Hunting Grounds to Mill Town (within shouting distance of this marker); Liberty Bridge
The Reedy River Marker and Falls image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 20, 2010
2. The Reedy River Marker and Falls
(within shouting distance of this marker); McBee's Mills (within shouting distance of this marker); Harriet Smith Wyche (within shouting distance of this marker); History of Falls Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Richard Pearis (within shouting distance of this marker); Camperdown Mill (within shouting distance of this marker); Cradle of Greenville (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Liberty Bridge (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Greenville.
 
More about this marker. This marker is one of a series of markers in the Historic Falls Park covering bits of Greenville's history.
 
Also see . . .
1. Reedy River. The Reedy River is a tributary of the Saluda River, about 65 mi long, in northwestern South Carolina in the United States. (Submitted on February 28, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Reedy River. The Reedy River drops down from the Smokey
Upper Reedy River Falls image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 20, 2010
3. Upper Reedy River Falls
Mountains of North Carolina, cross the border of South Carolina, then run directly under Main Street in downtown Greenville. (Submitted on February 28, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Friends of the Reedy River. Friends of the Reedy River is a local, grassroots, volunteer-based, non-profit conservation organization dedicated to promoting, preserving and restoring the Reedy River. (Submitted on February 28, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. 37th Annual Reedy River Run: March 5-6, 2010. During the mid-1970s, many young leaders in Greenville began looking for ways to bring some fun and energy back to downtown Greenville. (Submitted on February 28, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Falls Park on the Reedy. Official website of Falls Park. (Submitted on February 28, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. Welcome to Reedy River Historic Park. The Reedy River tumbles into steep falls at the Liberty Bridge, then meanders through rocky shallows with South Main Street's shops on one side and the Governor's School for the Arts & Humanities on the other. (Submitted on February 28, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. Traveler's Rest. The official website of Traveler's Rest. (Submitted on February 28, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
Gower, Cox and Markley Coach Factory<br>(a.k.a. The Wyche Pavilion) image. Click for more information.
By Brian Scott, February 15, 2009
4. Gower, Cox and Markley Coach Factory
(a.k.a. The Wyche Pavilion)
 

8. Travelers Rest, South Carolina. Travelers Rest is a city in Greenville County, South Carolina, United States. (Submitted on February 28, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

9. Greenville, South Carolina. Greenville is the seat of Greenville County, in upstate South Carolina, United States. (Submitted on February 28, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

10. Greenville, South Carolina. Official website of the City of Greenville. (Submitted on February 28, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

11. Saluda River. The Saluda River is a principal tributary of the Congaree River, about 200 mi long, in northern and western South Carolina in the United States. (Submitted on February 28, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

12. Reedy River Falls Historic Park and Greenway. The Reedy River Falls are not only the geographical but also the historical center of Greenville. (Submitted on February 28, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

13. Reedy River Industrial Historic District. The Reedy River Industrial Complex is the only area in downtown Greenville which has maintained its historic and architectural character as a nineteenth and early twentieth century industrial and commercial district. (Submitted on February 28, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.)
Reedy River Factory and Lake Conestee Dam image. Click for more information.
By Brian Scott, October 4, 2008
5. Reedy River Factory and Lake Conestee Dam
 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 28, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 679 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 28, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4. submitted on February 25, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5. submitted on October 6, 2008, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.
Paid Advertisement