Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Decatur in Morgan County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Hood’s Middle Tennessee Campaign and The Battle for Decatur

“A Hard Nut To Crack”

 

—The Battle for Decatur —

 
Hood’s Middle Tennessee Campaign and The Battle for Decatur Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, February 20, 2010
1. Hood’s Middle Tennessee Campaign and The Battle for Decatur Marker
Inscription. Following the fall of Atlanta on September 2, 1864, Confederate General John Bell Hood, Commander of the Army of Tennessee, began a series of maneuvers against the Union line of supply running from Atlanta through Northwest Georgia, North Alabama, and into Nashville.

Hood crossed the Chattahoochee River in late September, and marched north. Unable to gain any advantage in Northwest Georgia, Hood turned to cross the Tennessee River at Guntersville. However, Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest and his cavalry could not join forces with Hood if he crossed there. Union gunboats were also active around Guntersville. Furthermore, the damaged Memphis and Charleston Railroad ran from Confederate supply depots in North Mississippi to Decatur. By early October, Hood considered crossing the Tennessee River at Decatur and on October 9, he ordered the railroad be repaired to that place. Accordingly, the Army of Tennessee detoured for Decatur.

Hood’s army arrived outside Decatur on October 26, and for three days the small Union garrison defended the crossing with determination. Hood soon discovered that Decatur was “a hard nut to crack.” On the morning of October 30 his army marched through Courtland for Florence / Tuscumbia.

There Hood remained for three weeks, waiting for the flooded Tennessee River
Tour Stop 1 image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, February 20, 2009
2. Tour Stop 1
to subside, waiting for Forrest to join him with his cavalry, and waiting to accumulate supplies. When he finally moved, frustration and failure would await at Columbia and Spring Hill, disaster would await at Franklin, and final defeat and his army’s disintegration would await at Nashville.
 
Erected by City of Decatur. (Marker Number 1.)
 
Location. 34° 36.85′ N, 86° 59.002′ W. Marker is in Decatur, Alabama, in Morgan County. Marker is on Bank Street Northeast north of Church Street Northeast, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Decatur AL 35602, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Decatur and The Civil War in North Alabama (here, next to this marker); Battle of Decatur (a few steps from this marker); Old State Bank Building (a few steps from this marker); Rising Sun Lodge No. 29 (within shouting distance of this marker); First Railroad (within shouting distance of this marker); Historic Downtown/Founders Park (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Old Decatur Historic District/Old State Bank (about 300 feet away); Two Bridges Across The Tennessee River (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Decatur.
 
Related markers.
Portrait of General Hood image. Click for full size.
(National Archives and Records Administration), February 20, 2010
3. Portrait of General Hood
Confederate General John Bell Hood Commanded the Army of Tennessee at Decatur, October 26-30, 1864. Photo attributed to the National Archives and Records Administration.
Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. "A Hard Nut to Crack" Walking Tour of the Battle of Decatur
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Hood’s Middle Tennessee Campaign as Executed image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, February 20, 2010
4. Hood’s Middle Tennessee Campaign as Executed
The Railroad Crossing over the Tennessee River. image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, February 20, 2010
5. The Railroad Crossing over the Tennessee River.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 5, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 1,261 times since then and 67 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on March 5, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.   2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on March 6, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement