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Columbia in Richland County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Confederate Printing Plant

 
 
Confederate Printing Plant Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2010
1. Confederate Printing Plant Marker
Inscription. (Front text)
From April 1864 to February 1865 Confederate bonds and currency were printed and processed in this building, constructed in 1863-64 for the printing and stationery firm of Evans & Cogswell. That firm, founded in Charleston, produced bonds and currency for the Confederacy throughout the war and moved to Columbia in 1863. The Confederate Treasury Note Bureau moved its headquarters here as well in the spring of 1864.

(Reverse text)
After 1864 Evans and Cogswell printed almost all bonds and currency for the Confederate Treasury. Many young women were employed here to sign and cut sheets as they came off the press. When Federal troops burned part of the building in February 1865 they carried off the printing plates and “an immense quantity” of currency. The building served as a warehouse for the state liquor dispensary system from 1895 to 1907.
 
Erected 2002 by the Mary Boykin Chesnut Chapter No. 2517, United Daughters of the Confederacy, replacing Marker 40-36, erected by the City of Columbia in 1966. (Marker Number 40-124.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the United Daughters of the Confederacy marker series.
 
Location. 33° 59.881′ N, 81° 
Confederate Printing Plant Marker, reverse side image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 28, 2010
2. Confederate Printing Plant Marker, reverse side
2.658′ W. Marker is in Columbia, South Carolina, in Richland County. Marker is on Gervais Street (U.S. 1), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located between Pulaski and Huger Streets. Marker is in this post office area: Columbia SC 29201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Huger Street (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); State Dispensary Warehouse (about 400 feet away); Joseph D. Sapp Memorial Bridge (about 800 feet away); Williams Street / Gist Street (approx. 0.2 miles away); Doolittle Raiders (approx. 0.2 miles away); Seaboard Air Line Passenger Station (approx. 0.2 miles away); Site of Wayside Hospital (approx. 0.2 miles away); Gadsden Street (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Columbia.
 
Regarding Confederate Printing Plant. The Confederate Printing Plant was originally constructed by the firm of Evans and Cogswell for the manufacture of Confederate bonds and other printing purposes. During the Civil War, the printing firm of Evans and Cogswell in Charleston became one of the producers of bonds, certificates of stock and currency for the Confederate government. In 1864, the firm constructed the large building on Gervais Street in Columbia and relocated its business there. In February of 1865, when General W. T. Sherman’s army occupied
Confederate Printing Plant Marker seen along westbound Gervais Street (US 1, US 378) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 28, 2010
3. Confederate Printing Plant Marker seen along westbound Gervais Street (US 1, US 378)
Columbia, the building’s contents were seized and the plant was burned. After the war, the building was eventually repaired. The structure was later used as a liquor warehouse for the South Carolina Dispensary System. During the 1930s, the building was used in conjunction with the U.S. Seed Loan Program. It is a large two-story, commercial Greek Revival brick structure which spans the length of an entire city block. Originally it was a one-story structure with a gable roof. The second story was added after the building was burned in 1865. The southern façade is divided into repetitive bays by molded brick pilasters on both levels. A wide molded brick frieze separates the two stories. Listed in the National Register March 28, 1979. ( Historic Resources of Columbia )

National Register of Historic Places:
Confederate Printing Plant *** (added 1979 - - #79002393)
♦ Also known as Evans and Cogswell Company
♦ Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering
♦ Architect, builder, or engineer: Unknown
♦ Architectural Style: Greek Revival
♦ Area of Significance: Politics/Government, Industry, Architecture, Commerce
♦ Period of Significance: 1875-1899, 1850-1874
♦ Owner: Private
♦ Historic Function: Industry/Processing/Extraction
♦ Historic Sub-function: Communications
Confederate Printing Plant image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 28, 2010
4. Confederate Printing Plant
Facility, Manufacturing Facility
 
Also see . . .  Confederate Bond Engravers. 6) Evans & Cogswell. This Charleston, South Carolina firm was formed in ISSS-wighiallyunder the style of Walker and Cogswell. In 1860, James Walker took a back seat as a silent partner and was replaced by Major Benjamin Evans. The firm was renamed Evans & Cogswell. Evans went to Europe in late 1861 and at great risk procured badly needed manpower and supplies.... (Submitted on March 12, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWar, US Civil
 
Confederate Printing Plant , today, remodeled and houses a grocery store image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 28, 2010
5. Confederate Printing Plant , today, remodeled and houses a grocery store
at the intersection of Gervais Street (US 1, US 378) and Huger Street
Confederate Printing Plant image. Click for full size.
S.C. Dept. of Archives and History, September 15, 2006
6. Confederate Printing Plant
National Register of Historical Places: Confederate Printing Plant *** (added 1979 - Building - #79002393) Also known as Evans and Cogswell Company
Confederate Printing Plant , right face image. Click for full size.
S.C. Dept. of Archives and History, September 15, 2006
7. Confederate Printing Plant , right face
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 12, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,474 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on March 12, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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