Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Columbia in Richland County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Washington Street Methodist Church

 
 
Washington Street Methodist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2010
1. Washington Street Methodist Church Marker
Inscription.
A church was built here between 1803 and 1805; another church, erected 1832, was burned by Union troops in 1865 and reconstructed in 1866 of salvaged brick and clay mortar. Present church dedicated 1875. Bishop Wm. Capers (1790-1855), founder of missions to slaves in S. C., was pastor and is buried here.
 
Erected 1938 by The Columbia Sesquicentennial Commission of 1936. (Marker Number 40-21.)
 
Location. 34° 0.318′ N, 81° 1.9′ W. Marker is in Columbia, South Carolina, in Richland County. Marker is at the intersection of Marion Street and Washington Street, on the right when traveling north on Marion Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1401 Washington Street, Columbia SC 29201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Washington Street Methodist Church (here, next to this marker); Site of Columbia Female Academy (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of Columbia High School (within shouting distance of this marker); First Presbyterian Church Confederate Veterans Monument (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Cecil Herbert Land D.D.
Washington Street Methodist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
2. Washington Street Methodist Church Marker
(about 500 feet away); Ordinance of Secession (about 500 feet away); Site of Gibbes House (about 500 feet away); First Baptist Church (about 500 feet away); First Presbyterian Church (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named First Presbyterian Church (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Columbia.
 
Regarding Washington Street Methodist Church. National Register of Historic Places:
Washington Street United Methodist Church (added 1970 - - #70000599)
1401 Washington St. , Columbia
♦ Historic Significance: Event, Architecture/Engineering
♦ Architect, builder, or engineer: Unknown
♦ Architectural Style: Gothic
♦ Area of Significance: Architecture, Religion
♦ Period of Significance: 1850-1874
♦ Owner: Private
♦ Historic Function: Religion
♦ Historic Sub-function: Religious Structure
♦ Current Function: Religion
 
Also see . . .
1. Washington Street United Methodist Church. Washington Street
Washington Street Methodist Church Historical Plaques image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
3. Washington Street Methodist Church Historical Plaques
United Methodist Historic Site No. 139
National Register of Historic Places Medallion
American Revolution Bicentennial, Richland County Committee
(from left to right)
United Methodist Church is one of Columbia’s four most historic churches. (Submitted on August 16, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. Washington Street United Methodist Church. Washington Street United Methodist Church is a historic church at 1401 Washington Street in Columbia, South Carolina. (Submitted on August 16, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. History of the Washington Street United Methodist Church. With thankful hearts, Washington Street United Methodist Church celebrated its bicentennial year in 2003. (Submitted on August 16, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. William Capers, 1790-1855. William Capers, born in South Carolina in 1790, was a Methodist bishop, editor, and missionary. (Submitted on August 16, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Washington Street United Methodist Church - National Register Nomination form (1970)
Description
Red brick Victorian Gothic church, completed 1872, has double-shouldered buttresses, large arched center entrance with double doors flanked by similar arched entrances. Above left entrance is a fully developed tower with steeple; matching lines extend to the roofline on the right. On both towers are four pinnacles
Washington Street Methodist Church image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 21, 2010
4. Washington Street Methodist Church
topped by unusual crown-shaped ornaments. Exterior displays much use of stonework and ornate brickwork; closely-spaced modillions support outside cornice. stained glass windows; six on each side, one large at back of sanctuary, one above each entrance, one small on either side of main doorway. Windows depict life of Christ without using human figures.

Inside: ceiling of church has exposed beams; unusual shouldered Gothic doors on either side of sanctuary. Balcony in rear features curving Gothic balustrade.

Significance
One of Columbia's four most historic churches; fine example of Victorian Gothic architecture. Unusual shape of pinnacles gives appearance of Islamic influence. Chancel chairs in sanctuary were gift of Gen Wade Hampton III.

Congregation organized 1803; frame church, first house of worship in Columbia, built 1804 under direction of pastor John Harper, ordained by John Wesley. famous Methodist Bishop Francis Asbury frequently visited church in early 1800s. William Capers appointed pastor 1831 -- renowned preacher, much involved in education and minister of slaves, first bishop elected by Methodist Episcopal Church, South, buried beneath alter of present church. Brick structure erected in 1830s; burned 1865; according to legend, Union soldiers looking for First Baptist Church, site of first meeting of South Carolina Secession Convention,
Washington Street Methodist Church Spires image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
5. Washington Street Methodist Church Spires
were directed here by Baptist sexton. Small chapel built of brick salvaged from ruins and replaced 1972 by present church erected with funds collected throughout the nation.
    — Submitted August 16, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Churches, Etc.
 
Washington Street Methodist Church The Education Building of image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
6. Washington Street Methodist Church The Education Building of
Washington Street Methodist Church
Erected A.D. 1928
Pastor Arthur L. Gunter
Washington Street Methodist Church-The Education Building image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
7. Washington Street Methodist Church-The Education Building
Washington Street Methodist Church Facade (South Side) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
8. Washington Street Methodist Church Facade (South Side)
Washington Street Methodist Church Window and Spires image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, July 25, 2011
9. Washington Street Methodist Church Window and Spires
Washington Street Methodist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
10. Washington Street Methodist Church Marker
Washington Street Methodist Church image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud
11. Washington Street Methodist Church
Founded 1805
Rebuilt 1872
<i>Washington Street Methodist Church, Columbia, S.C.</i> image. Click for full size.
Postcard by Valentine & Sons, Ltd., circa 1913
12. Washington Street Methodist Church, Columbia, S.C.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 19, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 646 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on March 19, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2, 3. submitted on August 16, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4. submitted on March 19, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   5. submitted on June 26, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   6, 7. submitted on June 18, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   8, 9. submitted on August 16, 2011, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   10, 11. submitted on June 19, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   12. submitted on October 4, 2015. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement