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King of Prussia in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Commander in Chief’s Guards

An Elite Security Force

 

—Valley Forge National Historical Park —

 
Commander in Chief’s Guards Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, March 20, 2010
1. Commander in Chief’s Guards Marker
Inscription. Always present, Washington’s guard occupied huts here. This special detachment was created to protect the Commander in Chief, his official family, and his equipment, supplies, and papers. Washington required that each life guard, as they called themselves, be a native born American. It was assumed such men would be loyal, as they had a vested interest in the success of the war. Today this tradition continues in the form of the Third United States Infantry, a unit that stands guard at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington.

< Sidebar: >   In General Orders issued from Headquarters in Cambridge on March 11, 1776 Washington stated he wanted men “for their sobriety, honesty, and good behaviour; he wishes them to be from five feet, eight inches high, to five feet, ten inches; handsomely and well made, and as there is nothing in his eyes more desirable, than Clealiness in a Soldier, he desires that particular attention may be made, in the choice of such men, as are neat, and spruce.
 
Erected by Valley Forge National Historical Park.
 
Location. 40° 6.105′ N, 75° 27.584′ W. Marker is in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, in Montgomery County. Marker is on Valley Forge Road (
Marker in Valley Forge image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, March 20, 2010
2. Marker in Valley Forge
Pennsylvania Route 23), on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is on the tour road in Valley Forge National Historical Park at stop 5, Washington’s Headquarters. Marker is in this post office area: King of Prussia PA 19406, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Remembering Valley Forge (within shouting distance of this marker); Headquarters Complex (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Village of Valley Forge (about 300 feet away); American Icon (about 400 feet away); North of the River (about 400 feet away); Did You Know? (about 400 feet away); Why Valley Forge? (about 400 feet away); Washington’s Headquarters (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in King of Prussia.
 
More about this marker. The background of the marker features a picture of three members of Washington’s life guards in front of the soldier huts. The bottom left of the marker contains a picture of “The Banner of the Guard. Copyright Alexandria-Washington Lodge No. 22 A, F, & A. M. Photography by Arthur W. Pierson.” It has a caption of “When Baron de Steuben arrived in February 1778, the 47 privates in the Guard were all Virginians. At Steuben’s request 100 additional soldiers from states other than Virginia were annexed to the guard. Under
Commander in Chief’s Guards Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, March 20, 2010
3. Commander in Chief’s Guards Marker
Steuben’s instruction these soldiers would serve as a model company for drilling the entire army.”
 
Also see . . .  Valley Forge National Historical Park. National Park Service website. (Submitted on March 21, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
Life Guard Encampment image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, March 20, 2010
4. Life Guard Encampment
The marker can be seen to the left of the huts in the photo.
Life Guards Huts image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, March 20, 2010
5. Life Guards Huts
Washington's Life Guard occupied huts at this site near Washington's Headquarters at the Potts House during the 1777-78 winter encampment.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 21, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 915 times since then and 44 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on March 21, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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