Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Columbia in Richland County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Wesley Methodist Church

 
 
Wesley Methodist Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2010
1. Wesley Methodist Church Marker
Inscription. (Front text)
Wesley Methodist Church is the oldest African American Methodist congregation in Columbia. It was founded in 1869 by Rev. J.C. Emerson and was a separate black congregation instead of forming from an established white church. First called the Columbia Mission, it met upstairs in a Main St. building and later built its own chapel. About 1910 the Columbia Mission bought this lot and was renamed Wesley Methodist Episcopal Church.
(Reverse text)
This Gothic Revival church, built in 1910-11, was designed by noted Columbia architect Arthur W. Hamby, who designed other churches in Columbia as well as in Winnsboro, Bishopville, and St. Matthews. Its high-style Late Gothic design is relatively unusual for an African-American church of its period, and is notable for its two asymmetrical towers, decorative brickwork, and pointed-arch stained glass windows.
 
Erected 2008 by The Historic Columbia Foundation, the City of Columbia, and the S.C. Department of Transportation. (Marker Number 40-146.)
 
Location. 34° 0.264′ N, 81° 1.452′ W. Marker is in Columbia, South Carolina, in Richland County. Marker is at the intersection of Gervais Street (US 1, US 76, US 378) and Barnwell Street
Wesley Methodist Church Marker, reverse side image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 28, 2010
2. Wesley Methodist Church Marker, reverse side
, on the right when traveling west on Gervais Street (US 1, US 76, US 378). Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Columbia SC 29201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Barnwell Street (within shouting distance of this marker); Gregg Street (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Henderson Street (about 600 feet away); Last Home of Wade Hampton (about 700 feet away); Sherman's Headquarters (about 700 feet away); Pickens Street (approx. 0.2 miles away); Fair-Rutherford House / Rutherford House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Horry-Guignard House (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Columbia.
 
Regarding Wesley Methodist Church. Wesley Methodist Church, built in 1910-11, illustrates the impact of segregation in the lives of African Americans during the Jim Crow era in Columbia. Because it is a historically African-American church, Wesley Methodist Church helps explain religious segregation, particularly within the Methodist denomination. The church is also significant as a good example of Late Gothic Revival church architecture in Columbia in the early twentieth century, and as an excellent example of the work of Columbia architect Arthur W. Hamby. Wesley Methodist Church was founded in 1869 as the Columbia Mission. Their first chapel was built between
Wesley Methodist Church and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 28, 2010
3. Wesley Methodist Church and Marker
1870 and 1873 and was later sold when the Columbia Mission purchased property at the corner of Gervais and Barnwell Streets. In 1910, the Columbia Mission was renamed Wesley Methodist Episcopal Church. Set on a partially subterranean basement that is capped with a stone or cast stone water table, Wesley Methodist Church features a solid brick wall foundation and exterior walls. The primary facade has asymmetrical twin towers, with the taller tower on the east side. The façade is crenellated with stone and brick battlements along the top and at the tops of the towers. Between the two towers is a triple, pointed arch window with tracery, stained glass panels, and a cream-colored limestone drip mold. Each side facade has eight, pointed-arch stained-glass windows with cream-colored sandstone drip molds. A cross-gabled bay transept projects from the building and features a gabled parapet and a large pointed-arch stained-glass window identical to the primary facade. Listed in the National Register January 29, 2009.(Historic Resources of Segregation in Columbia, South Carolina, 1880-1960 )
 
Also see . . .  National Register of Historic Places Registration Form. (Submitted on March 29, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.)
 
Categories. African AmericansChurches, Etc.
 
Wesley Methodist Church image. Click for full size.
S.C. Dept . of Archives and History
4. Wesley Methodist Church
Wesley Methodist Church image. Click for full size.
S.C. Dept. of Archives and History
5. Wesley Methodist Church
Wesley Methodist Church image. Click for full size.
S.C. Dept. of Archives and History
6. Wesley Methodist Church
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 29, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 665 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on March 29, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement