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James Island in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Secessionville

 
 
Secessionville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 6, 2013
1. Secessionville Marker
Inscription. The Battle of Secessionville, fought here on 16 June 1862, broke the Union advance through James Island against Charleston and was the most significant battle of the Civil War in South Carolina.

Confederate troops under Col. Thomas G. Lamar defended simple unfinished earthwork later enlarged and named Fort Lamar, which sat in the narrow end of a funnel-shaped strip of high ground flanked by tidal creeks and marsh. Union troops under Henry W. Benham launched several assaults against the earthwork which anchored the eastern end of the Confederate line, but were repulsed with heavy casualties and soon evacuated James Island altogether a few days later.

A total of 683 Federals and 204 Confederates were killed, wounded or captured. Of these totals, 107 Federals and 52 Confederates lost their lives on this battlefield. Walk softly on this hallowed ground.

Left Side of Monument:
Confederates
47th Georgia Infantry
51st Georgia Infantry
4th Louisiana Battalion
1st South Carolina Infantry
(Hagood’s Regiment)
22nd South Carolina Infantry
24th South Carolina Infantry
25th South Carolina Infantry
(Eutaw Regiment)
1st South Carolina Battalion
(Charleston Battalion)
9th South Carolina Battalion
(Pee Dee Battalion)
1st South Carolina Artillery
Boyce’s Light Battery
Secessionville Marker, left side image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 6, 2010
2. Secessionville Marker, left side
South Carolina Artillery
(MacBeth Light Artillery)

Back of Monument:
This monument was erected by the Washington Light Infantry on the 10th day of May 2003, in memory of its members who served in companies A and B of the Eutaw Regiment.
2nd Lt. Richard W. Greer
Sgt. Fleetwood Lanneau, Jr.
Pvt. Thomas N. Gadsen, Jr.
Pvt. Samuel Salters
Pvt. John L. Sheppard
Pvt. John H. Taverner

Right side
Federals
6th Connecticut Infantry
7th Connecticut Infantry
28th Massachusetts Infantry
8th Michigan Infantry
3rd New Hampshire Infantry
46th New York Infantry
47th New York Infantry
79th New York Infantry
45th Pennsylvania Infantry
76th Pennsylvania Infantry
97th Pennsylvania Infantry
100th Pennsylvania Infantry
1st New York Engineers
3rd United States Artillery
1st Connecticut Light Artillery
3rd Rhode Island Heavy Artillery
1st Massachusetts Cavalry

 
Erected 2003 by Washington Light Infantry.
 
Location. 32° 42.295′ N, 79° 56.761′ W. Marker is in James Island, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is on Fort Lamar Road, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker
Secessionville Marker, back side image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 6, 2010
3. Secessionville Marker, back side
Washington Light Infantry
is in Fort Lamar on James Island. Marker is in this post office area: Charleston SC 29412, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Battle of Secessionville (a few steps from this marker); Riversville / Battle of Secessionville (approx. 0.4 miles away); Battery Number 5 (approx. half a mile away); Battery Reed (approx. 0.8 miles away); Redoubt Number 3 (approx. 1.6 miles away); Battle of Sol-Legare Island (approx. 2.1 miles away); Battery Haskell (approx. 2.6 miles away); Battery Cheves (approx. 3.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in James Island.
 
Also see . . .
1. Secessionville. CWSAC Battle Summaries webpage. (Submitted on August 1, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Field Trip: Fort Lamar Heritage Preserve. The war infamous for pitting brother against brother did just that at Fort Lamar. Scottish brothers James and Alexander Campbell immigrated to the United States in the 1850s, choosing very different areas in which to settle. Alexander, a stonemason by trade, settled in New York City and signed up with the Union Army when the war broke out. His older brother, James, landed in Charleston and received a commission with the Confederate Army.... (Submitted on April 6, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.)
Secessionville Marker, right face image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 6, 2010
4. Secessionville Marker, right face
Federals
 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Secessionville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 6, 2013
5. Secessionville Marker
Markers at Fort Lamar image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 6, 2013
6. Markers at Fort Lamar
Secessionville Marker at Fort Lamar image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 6, 2010
7. Secessionville Marker at Fort Lamar
Fort Lamar Map #1 image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, February 20, 2010
8. Fort Lamar Map #1
Fort Lamar Map #2 image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, February 20, 2010
9. Fort Lamar Map #2
Fort Lamar Earthworks image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, February 20, 2010
10. Fort Lamar Earthworks
Units of flanking division attack Confederate sharpshooters during Battle of Secessionville image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, February 20, 2010
11. Units of flanking division attack Confederate sharpshooters during Battle of Secessionville
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 1, 2009, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,823 times since then and 79 times this year. Last updated on April 6, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. Photos:   1. submitted on August 6, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2, 3, 4. submitted on April 6, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   5, 6. submitted on August 6, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   7. submitted on April 6, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on August 11, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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