Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Independence in Inyo County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Manzanar

 
 
Manzanar Marker image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, August 25, 2007
1. Manzanar Marker
Inscription. In the early part of the World War II, 110,000 persons of Japanese ancestry were interned in relocation centers by Executive Order No. 9066, issued on February 19, 1942.

Manzanar, the first of ten such concentration camps, was bounded by barbed wire and guard towers, confining 10,000 persons, the majority being American citizens.

May the injustices and humiliation suffered here as a result of hysteria, racism and economic exploitation never emerge again.

California Registered Historical Landmark No. 850

Plaque placed by the State Department of Parks and Recreation in cooperation with the Manzanar Committee and the Japanese American Citizens League, April 14, 1973.

 
Erected 1973 by State Department of Parks and Recreation in cooperation with the Manzanar Committee and the Japanese American Citizens League. (Marker Number 850.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 36° 43.572′ N, 118° 8.687′ W. Marker is in Independence, California, in Inyo County. Marker is on Highway 395, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Independence CA 93526, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Blue Star Memorial Highway image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, August 25, 2007
2. Blue Star Memorial Highway
A tribute to the Armed Forces that have defended the United States of America

Sponsored by Oasis Garden Club of Indian Wells Valley
Ridgecrest, California
California Garden Clubs, Inc. in cooperation with California Department of Transportation

~~~~~~~
In honor of Americans of Japanese Ancestry who served in the 100th/442nd Regimental Combat Team and the Military Intelligence Service during World War II
At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A Community's Living Room (approx. 0.2 miles away); Weaving for the War (approx. 0.4 miles away); Legacy (approx. 0.9 miles away); Sacred Space (approx. one mile away); Alabama Gates (approx. 4.2 miles away); Kearsarge Station (approx. 5.8 miles away); Edwards House (approx. 6.1 miles away); Mary Austinís Home (approx. 6.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Independence.
 
Also see . . .
1. Manzanar National Historic Site. (Submitted on October 14, 2007, by Karen Key of Sacramento, California.)
2. Reassembling a Sad Chapter of History. (Submitted on October 14, 2007, by Karen Key of Sacramento, California.)
3. Information on Manzanar. (Submitted on October 14, 2007, by Karen Key of Sacramento, California.)
4. Ansel Adamsís Photographs of Japanese-American Internment at Manzanar. (Submitted on October 14, 2007, by Karen Key of Sacramento, California.)
5. The Manzanar Committee. (Submitted on October 14, 2007, by Karen Key of Sacramento, California.)
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesNotable EventsPoliticsSettlements & SettlersWar, World II
 
Manzanar Marker image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, August 25, 2007
3. Manzanar Marker
Marker at Interpretive Center image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, August 25, 2007
4. Marker at Interpretive Center
Manzanar
Has been designated a
National Historic Landmark
This site possesses national significance
in commemorating the history of the
United States of America
1985
National Park Service
United States Department of the Interior
Interpretive Center image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, August 25, 2007
5. Interpretive Center
Entry Way image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, August 25, 2007
6. Entry Way
Guard Tower image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, August 25, 2007
7. Guard Tower
Administration image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, August 25, 2007
8. Administration
Post Office image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, August 25, 2007
9. Post Office
Block 14 image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, August 25, 2007
10. Block 14
Baseball Fields image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, August 25, 2007
11. Baseball Fields
Block 34 Garden image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, August 25, 2007
12. Block 34 Garden
Currently being restored
Block 34 Garden image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, August 25, 2007
13. Block 34 Garden
Manzanar Marker image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, August 25, 2007
14. Manzanar Marker
Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, August 25, 2007
15. Cemetery
Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, August 25, 2007
16. Cemetery
Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, August 25, 2007
17. Cemetery
Pet Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, August 25, 2007
18. Pet Cemetery
Pet Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, August 25, 2007
19. Pet Cemetery
Buddhist Temple image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, August 25, 2007
20. Buddhist Temple
Internal Police Sentry Post image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, August 25, 2007
21. Internal Police Sentry Post
National Park Passport Stamp image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, November 12, 2011
22. National Park Passport Stamp
Manzanar NHS
1986-2011
Passport 25th Anniversary
Model of the Manzanar Camp image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, February 11, 2009
23. Model of the Manzanar Camp
On display at the Manzanar Museum.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 14, 2007, by Karen Key of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 2,522 times since then and 59 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21. submitted on October 14, 2007, by Karen Key of Sacramento, California.   22. submitted on December 23, 2011, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California.   23. submitted on April 27, 2012, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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