Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Volcano in Hawaii County, Hawaii — Hawaiian Island Archipelago (Pacific Ocean)
 

Site of Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

 
 
Site of Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Marker image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, September 1, 2007
1. Site of Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Marker
Inscription. 1912-1942
For nearly 30 years, America’s first full-time volcano observatory occupied this site. Under the direction of Dr. Thomas A. Jaggar, world renowned volcanologist, the expertise to monitor and study volcanoes was developed. In 1942, the observatory was relocated to Uwekahuna, overlooking Haema’uma’u, to make way for the Volcano House Hotel.
This concrete piling served as a base for cameras and transits. The mound covers the old Whitney Seismograph Vault, where early seismic instruments were located.

 
Location. 19° 25.747′ N, 155° 15.497′ W. Marker is in Volcano, Hawaii, in Hawaii County. Touch for map. Marker is behind the vistor center. Marker is in this post office area: Volcano HI 96785, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 3 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Kilauea (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Countless are the Accomplishments of Roosevelt's Trusty "Tree Army" (about 400 feet away); The "Firepit" of Halema'uma'u (approx. 2.4 miles away).
 
More about this marker. Photo caption: Whitney Seismograph Vault Interior

 
Also see . . .  USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.
Site of Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Marker image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, September 1, 2007
2. Site of Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Marker
(Submitted on October 15, 2007, by Karen Key of Sacramento, California.)
 
Categories. 20th CenturyEnvironmentNotable Buildings
 
Site of Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Marker image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, September 1, 2007
3. Site of Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Marker
Caldera View image. Click for full size.
By Michael Stroud, October 1, 2000
4. Caldera View
Sulpher and Smoke image. Click for full size.
By Michael Stroud, October 1, 2000
5. Sulpher and Smoke
Kilauea Crater image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, September 1, 2007
6. Kilauea Crater
A Visit to The Volcano image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, September 1, 2007
7. A Visit to The Volcano
... I forgot to say that the noise made by the bubbling lava is not great, heard as we heard it from our lofty perch. It makes three distinct sounds - a rushing; a hissing, and a coughing or puffing sound, and if you stand on the brink and close your eyes, it is no trick at all to imagine that you are sweeping down a river on a large low-pressure steamer and that you hear the hissing of the steam about her boilers ...

The smell of sulfur is strong, but not unpleasant to a sinner.
Mark Twain, Roughing It, 1866
Kilauea, Rising Smoke Cloud image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, September 1, 2007
8. Kilauea, Rising Smoke Cloud
A caldera has likely existed at Kilauea's summit for as long as has the volcano. Collapse occurred repeatedly as magma swelled the summit area and then drained rapidly through the flanking rift zones. large fault blocks have formed here and at Uwekahuna Bluff as repeated collapse steepened the caldera walls.

Since the last major collapse, repeated overflows of Halemaumau and eruptions from the caldera floor have partially refilled the basin. Early Western explorers described a much different scene, with cliffs 900 feet high. Today cliffs rise half that height, indicating the pace of caldera filling during historic time.
Kilauea Crater image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, September 1, 2007
9. Kilauea Crater
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 15, 2007, by Karen Key of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 1,771 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 15, 2007, by Karen Key of Sacramento, California.   4, 5. submitted on January 4, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on October 15, 2007, by Karen Key of Sacramento, California. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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