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San Angelo in Tom Green County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The Tenth Cavalry

 
 
The Tenth Cavalry Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gregory Walker, April 4, 2010
1. The Tenth Cavalry Marker
Inscription. Following the Civil War, the United States Congress authorized the creation of six regiments of black U.S. Army troops. The Tenth Cavalry was organized in 1867 under the leadership of Col. Benjamin Grierson (1826-1911). The order creating black troops also specified that they would be commanded by white officers. Facing problems of racial discrimination at the regiment's headquarters in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, Grierson wanted the Tenth Cavalry reassigned to the West, and they arrived at Fort Concho in the Spring of 1875.

The contributions of the men of the Tenth Cavalry to the settlement of the American West are of major importance. They took part in grueling scouting and mapping expeditions and campaigns against hostile Indians, often facing days without proper supplies or water on the high plains. They were instrumental in the defeat of the Mescalero Apache Indians led by Chief Victorio in 1880.

The men of the Tenth Cavalry were stationed at Fort Concho until 1882, when they were moved to Fort Davis. Transferred frequently after 1885, members of the unit eventually served throughout the world, including Cuba, North Africa, Germany, Korea, and Vietnam. (1987)
 
Erected 1987 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 5227.)
 
Location.
Visitor entrance to Fort Concho with Tenth Cavalry and other markers. image. Click for full size.
By Gregory Walker, April 4, 2010
2. Visitor entrance to Fort Concho with Tenth Cavalry and other markers.
31° 27.284′ N, 100° 25.882′ W. Marker is in San Angelo, Texas, in Tom Green County. Marker is on S. Oakes Street just from E. Ave. C, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: San Angelo TX 76901, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort Concho (here, next to this marker); E. H. Danner (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Construction of the Fort (about 700 feet away); Orient-Santa Fe Freight Depot (about 700 feet away); Municipal Swimming Pool (approx. 0.2 miles away); Orient-Santa Fe Passenger Depot (approx. 0.2 miles away); Early Public Transportation in San Angelo (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Schwartz & Raas and San Angelo National Bank Building (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Angelo.
 
Also see . . .
1. Tenth United States Cavalry. article in the Handbook of Texas Online. (Submitted on April 18, 2010, by Gregory Walker of La Grange, Texas.) 

2. Buffalo Soldiers. article in the Handbook of Texas Online. (Submitted on April 18, 2010, by Gregory Walker of La Grange, Texas.) 

3. Benjamin Grierson, Handbook of Texas Online. (Submitted on May 1, 2010, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.)
4. Edith Grierson, Fort Concho's ghost ?. "..Edith Grierson, daughter of the post commander Benjamin Grierson, tragically
Panorama, Fort Concho parade grounds image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney
3. Panorama, Fort Concho parade grounds
passed away in the upstairs bedroom of Officers’ Quarters 1 on September 9, 1878, a victim of typhoid fever. Her ghost has been spotted by several guests.." (Submitted on May 1, 2010, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansMilitaryWars, US Indian
 
Grierson's quarters, Fort Concho image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, April 4, 2010
4. Grierson's quarters, Fort Concho
Grierson's daugther, Edith, died of typhoid fever, at age thirteen, while living in this house at Fort Concho.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 18, 2010, by Gregory Walker of La Grange, Texas. This page has been viewed 661 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 18, 2010, by Gregory Walker of La Grange, Texas.   3, 4. submitted on May 1, 2010, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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