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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Rearming the Fort

 
 
Rearming the Fort Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 3, 2010
1. Rearming the Fort Marker
Inscription. The fort wall before you, called the right face, sustained the least damage of any of Fort Sumter's walls (scarps) during the Union bombardment of 1863-65.

After the Civil War, the fort's first-tier casemates including those before you, were rearmed with 100-pounder rifled Parrott cannon. These guns came from Morris Island, about one mile south of here, and could be the same guns the Union fired on Fort Sumter during the Civil War. Eleven Parrott guns occupy these right face casemates today.
 
Erected by Fort Sumter National Monument, South Carolina - National Park Service - U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 32° 45.151′ N, 79° 52.455′ W. Marker is near Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Touch for map. Marker is located at Fort Sumter National Monument and only reached by boat. See links below for more information about access to the site. Marker is in this post office area: Charleston SC 29412, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Columbiad (a few steps from this marker); 6.4-Inch (100-Pounder) Parrott (a few steps from this marker); 8-inch (200 Pounder) Parrott (within shouting distance
Marker Beside the Casemates image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 3, 2010
2. Marker Beside the Casemates
of this marker); H.L. Hunley (within shouting distance of this marker); Controlling the Harbor (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Moultrie (within shouting distance of this marker); Flags of the Fort (within shouting distance of this marker); Siege of Fort Sumter (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Charleston.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left of the marker is a photograph of Rifled Parrott cannon on siege carriages, Morris Island, 1864. Guns like these, perhaps even the ones pictured here, were moved to the casemates in front of you in the 1870s.

On the right are photos of the cannons and casemates taken during restoration. When the United States modernized its seacoast defenses in the 1890s, these casemates were filled with sand to strengthen the old fort. Excavation in 1959 opened the casemates and the mounted Parrott guns were discovered.
 
Also see . . .  Directions to Fort Sumter. The only way to reach the fort is by boat. Most visitors use the Spirit
100-pdr Parrott Rifle image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 3, 2010
3. 100-pdr Parrott Rifle
One of the eleven 100-pdr Parrott Rifles on display at Fort Sumter. Being buried for some time, these guns are pitted and corroded, as seen here.
Line Cruises, although private boats are allowed. (Submitted on May 13, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Parrotts in the Casemates image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 3, 2010
4. Parrotts in the Casemates
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 13, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 679 times since then and 29 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on May 13, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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