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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Adel in Dallas County, Iowa — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Panther

Panther Revisited

 
 
Text on Panther Marker image. Click for full size.
By John Desaulniers, Jr.
1. Text on Panther Marker
Inscription. The community of Panther was located where you are currently standing. In the late 1800s, three buildings stood on this site: a blacksmith shop, a tin shop, and a general store. As Panther continued to grow, a creamery and post office also served the area. The blacksmith shop sat on the northeast side of the intersection. Like many Iowa blacksmiths, Amos Royer repaired farm machinery and shoed horses. The tin shop sat on the southwest side of the intersection and was operated by Will Beazor. Mr. Beazor repaired windmills and pumps.

The original Panther store started in response to the business the blacksmith and tin shops were generating. The original store sat on the southeast corner of the intersection and was operated by Israel Beaver. In February of 1898 a group of farmers started a new general store building on the northwest corner (where you are now). Because it served a vast area, the Panther store sold a wide variety of things. It also served as a place to socialize on Saturday nights.

It was the construction of Highway 44 that brought the most change to Panther. The road linked the Panther area with the neighboring communities. Eventually a garage was built at Panther as more people began to drive cars and needed repairs for those cars. However as people depended more on the automobile, the store lost most of
Panther Marker image. Click for full size.
By John Desaulniers, Jr., May 6, 2004
2. Panther Marker
its business to larger towns. As the years passed and business declined, Panther soon vanished from the roadside. All that remains is the foundation of the garage on the northeast side of the intersection and memories.
 
Erected by Tileyard Hill Questers.
 
Location. 41° 41.315′ N, 94° 6.348′ W. Marker is near Adel, Iowa, in Dallas County. Marker is at the intersection of J Avenue (County Route P58) and 240th Street (Iowa Highway 44), on the right when traveling south on J Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2399 County Highway P58, Adel IA 50003, United States of America.
 
Regarding Panther. Noted at the bottom right corner of marker:
The text in this exhibit is from an article title "Panther Store Revisited, printed in the publication, Wildrows,Vol. 1, No. 2, Spring 1978. The original text has been edited. This sign was sponsored by the Tileyard Hill Questers.
 
Also see . . .
1. Skelly Oil - Wikipedia. The gas station in Panther, both in the 1930s and 1940s sold Skelly Oil. Later Skelly would become part of Getty Oil as this link describes. (Submitted on May 17, 2010, by John Desaulniers, Jr. of Mingo, Iowa.) 

2. Iowa Non-Registered Routes [Panora Speedway]
Panther Marker and Stone image. Click for full size.
By John Desaulniers, Jr., May 6, 2004
3. Panther Marker and Stone
. Highway 44, referenced in this marker, was originally known as Panora Speedway through this part of Iowa. The town of Panora is 13.3 miles from where Panther used to be. (Submitted on May 17, 2010, by John Desaulniers, Jr. of Mingo, Iowa.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNotable Places
 
Panther Store - Displayed on Marker image. Click for full size.
4. Panther Store - Displayed on Marker
Panther Garage Displayed on Marker image. Click for full size.
circa 1930's
5. Panther Garage Displayed on Marker
Panther Garage - Displayed on Marker image. Click for full size.
circa 1940's
6. Panther Garage - Displayed on Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 17, 2010, by John Desaulniers, Jr. of Mingo, Iowa. This page has been viewed 957 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on May 17, 2010, by John Desaulniers, Jr. of Mingo, Iowa. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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