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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Taylor in Williamson County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Dr. James Lee Dickey

 
 
Dr. James Lee Dickey Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, June 28, 2007
1. Dr. James Lee Dickey Marker
Inscription. Physician, humanitarian, civil rights advocate and concerned citizen Dr. James Lee Dickey (d. 1959) had a profound effect on the quality of life in his adopted hometown of Taylor. Born in McLennan County in 1893, he attended Waco public schools and Tillotson College, Austin. Military service in World War I interrupted his training at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee, but upon graduation in 1921, he returned to central Texas to help his widowed mother raise his eight siblings. He settled in Taylor with his wife, Magnolia (Fowler) (1902–1959), as the city’s only African American doctor at the time.

Dr. Dickey worked hard to address the public health needs of Taylor, calling for improvements to the local water supply and heading a community effort against an outbreak of typhoid fever in 1932-33. A clinic he opened in a house at that time expanded to serve residents of the city and counties in the surrounding area. He developed programs for infant care and was instrumental in admitting African American patients to state tubercular clinics.

Dr. Dickey’s advocacy extended beyond health care to education and civil rights. He worked for passage of school bonds and improvements, and led efforts for local recreational facilities and federal housing. He was also a founder of the Taylor Negro Chamber of
Future Home of Dr. James Dickey Museum image. Click for full size.
By Keith Peterson, June 28, 2007
2. Future Home of Dr. James Dickey Museum
Commerce and served as a trustee of Tillotson College.

For his efforts, Dr. Dickey received numerous awards and honors, including distinction by the Taylor Chamber of Commerce as Man of the Year in 1952. His greatest rewards, however, came through his lasting contributions to the citizens of Taylor. As he noted, “to live in the hearts of those we leave behind is not to die.”
 
Erected 2006 by the Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 13616.)
 
Location. 30° 34.327′ N, 97° 24.32′ W. Marker is in Taylor, Texas, in Williamson County. Marker is on Burkett Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 500 Burkett St, Taylor TX 76574, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Bill Pickett (approx. ¼ mile away); City of Taylor (approx. ¼ mile away); Preslar-Hewitt Building (approx. 0.3 miles away); Eikel-Prewitt Building (approx. 0.3 miles away); First Presbyterian Church of Taylor (approx. 0.3 miles away); Taylor National Bank (approx. 0.3 miles away); First Christian Church of Taylor (approx. 0.3 miles away); Taylor Post Office (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Taylor.
 
Also see . . .
1. Handbook of Texas Online: James Lee Dickey. (Submitted on October 21, 2007, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas.)
2. Williamson County Historical Museum: Dr. James Lee Dickey. An article about Dr. Dickey published in The Sunday Sun on July 9, 2006. (Submitted on October 21, 2007, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas.) 
 
Categories. African Americans
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 21, 2007, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas. This page has been viewed 2,623 times since then and 126 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 21, 2007, by Keith Peterson of Cedar Park, Texas. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. A wide area photo of the marker and the surrounding area in context. • Can you help?
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