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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Blue Ridge Summit in Franklin County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Battle of Monterey Pass

 
 
The Battle of Monterey Pass Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 15, 2010
1. The Battle of Monterey Pass Marker
Inscription. During the morning hours of July 4th 1863, General Robert E. Lee's Confederate Army began its withdrawal from Gettysburg. General Lee ordered two key mountain passes at Monterey and Fairfield to be secured for the Confederate retreat. These two passes provided the shortest distance back to the Potomac River. The main portion of the Confederate Army would cross over South Mountain at Monterey Pass marching toward Williamsport, Maryland.

With concerns of the wagon train being attacked by Federal cavalry, Confederate General Grumble Jones volunteered his command to escort it back into Virginia. Through the driving rain, General Ewell's wagon train rumbled out of Fairfield taking a portion of modern day Iron Springs Road to Fairfield Gap, then through Monterey Pass via Maria Furnace Road.

Here is the spot Confederate Captain William Tanner saw the eastern slope of Monterey was left unprotected. He ordered one Napoleon cannon and its limber to be deployed near the Clermont house where the Emmitsburg and Waynesboro Turnpike begins to descend down the eastern slope of the South Mountain.

At around 9 p.m. the 5th Michigan Cavalry came in contact with Confederate pickets of Captain George Emack's company of the 1st Maryland Cavalry that was positioned near the Clermont House. As the weather conditions worsened, the Federal
The Battle of Monterey Pass Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, July 11, 2015
2. The Battle of Monterey Pass Marker
The original marker was replaced with a new marker with a different layout and text.
soldiers failed to recognize the Confederate pickets who were wearing black gum blankets over their uniforms. Without making any demonstration, using their bodies to shield the gun, Captain Tanner ordered the cannon to fire.

The 8th Pennsylvania Cavalry dismounted and began to advance on the Emack's position. Seeing that he might be out flanked, Captain Emack withdrew his force about 200 yards past the Monterey House. Captain Tanner then ordered to have the cannon be redeployed from its current position and reinforce Captain Emack where his troopers were. The maneuver was carried out in such a hurry that Captain Tanner's men were forced to leave their limber behind and members of the 8th Pennsylvania took possession of it.

During the Civil War, David Miller was the formal Monterey Inn manager. In 1861, he began to build the Clermont House which was opened to the public in 1864. Among the attendees to stay was Union General Ulysses S. Grant.
 
Location. This marker has been replaced by another marker nearby. It was located near 39° 44.329′ N, 77° 28.136′ W. Marker was near Blue Ridge Summit, Pennsylvania, in Franklin County. Marker was on Charmian Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located in front of the Hawley Memorial Church. Marker was in this post office area: Blue Ridge Summit PA 17214, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
The Battle of Monterey Pass Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 15, 2010
3. The Battle of Monterey Pass Marker
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. A different marker also named The Battle of Monterey Pass (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named The Battle of Monterey Pass (here, next to this marker); Monterey Academy (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named The Battle of Monterey Pass (approx. half a mile away but has been reported missing); 10,000 Soldiers Fight at Monterey Pass (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named The Battle of Monterey Pass (approx. half a mile away); The Retreat From Gettysburg (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named The Battle of Monterey Pass (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Blue Ridge Summit.
 
More about this marker. This marker was replaced by a new one also named The Battle of Monterey Pass (see nearby markers).
 
Also see . . .  Monterey Pass Battlefield Association. The association provides many resources including a guide to the battlefield. (Submitted on May 21, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
David Miller Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Graff
4. David Miller Marker
Tablet reads: In remembrance of the kindness of David Miller, for thirty five years the proprietor of Clermont. This tablet has been placed by his neighbors.

During the Battle of Monterey Pass, July 4-5, 1863, David Miller was held prisoner for a short time by Confederates and later aided Union General Kilpatrick by providing information on the local roads.
The Battle of Monterey Pass Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, July 11, 2015
5. The Battle of Monterey Pass Marker
Emack's first line of defense was near the the post-war Hawley Memorial Prysbeterian Church grounds. Reverse sides of the markers are visible on the fence.
Tanner's Cannon image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 15, 2010
6. Tanner's Cannon
Captain Tanner deployed his 12-pdr Napoleon cannon along the road at this point to block Federals attempting to disrupt the Confederate retreat.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 16, 2017. This page originally submitted on May 21, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,212 times since then and 69 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on May 21, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on November 14, 2016, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.   3. submitted on May 21, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on June 23, 2011, by David Graff of Halifax, Nova Scotia.   5. submitted on November 14, 2016, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.   6. submitted on May 21, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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