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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Downtown in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Decatur House

 
 
Decatur House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
1. Decatur House Marker
Inscription. (Upper Plaque):
Decatur House

Has been designated a
Registered National
Historic Landmark


Under the provisions of the
Historic Sites Act of August 21, 1935
This site possesses exceptional value
in commemorating and illustrating
the history of the United States

U.S. Department of the Interior
National Park Service
1961


(Lower Plaque):
This house, built in 1819
was the home of
Commodore Stephen Decatur
who died here
March 22, 1820,
from wounds received in a duel
with Commodore Barron
———
Among other distinguished men
who lived here, were
Henry Clay
Martin Van Buren
Edward Livingston
George M. Dallas
Edward F. Beale
Truxton Beale

 
Erected 1961 by U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 38° 54.005′ N, 77° 2.29′ W. Marker is in Downtown, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of H Street NW and Jackson Place, on the right when traveling east on H Street NW. Touch for map. Marker
Decatur House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
2. Decatur House Marker
is at or near this postal address: 1610 H Street NW, Washington DC 20005, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy (here, next to this marker); Baron von Steuben Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Restoration of Jackson Place and Lafayette Square (within shouting distance of this marker); Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); General Comte Jean de Rochambeau Memorial (about 400 feet away); Francis Preston Blair (about 400 feet away); The Blair House (about 400 feet away); The Bernard Baruch Bench of Inspiration (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Downtown.
 
Regarding Decatur House. "The slave quarters at Decatur House is one of only a few remaining examples of slave quarters in an urban setting and also is uniquely significant as the only remaining physical evidence that African Americans were held in bondage within sight of the Executive Mansion. Though the exact date of construction is unknown, records indicate the quarters were possibly built as a one story structure as early as September 1821 during the tenancy of the French foreign minister..."
Source: Decatur House on Lafayette Square [see first
Decatur House image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 4, 2007
3. Decatur House
link below].

 
Also see . . .
1. The Decatur House Museum. (Submitted on December 15, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
2. "The Half Had Not Been Told Me: African Americans on Lafayette Square". featured exhibit at the Decatur House Museum. (Submitted on June 22, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 
 
Additional keywords. Benjamin Henry Latrobe, “Father of American Architecture”; Headquarters, National Trust for Historic Preservation; slavery.
 
Categories. African AmericansLandmarksNotable BuildingsNotable Persons
 
The Decatur House slave quarters on H Street - the present home of the Decatur House Museum image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 21, 2010
4. The Decatur House slave quarters on H Street - the present home of the Decatur House Museum
Decatur House undergoing renovations, 2010 - note temporary historical signage on scaffolds image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, May 21, 2010
5. Decatur House undergoing renovations, 2010 - note temporary historical signage on scaffolds
“... While enslaved here in 1829, Charlotte Dupuy sued Secretary of State Henry Clay for her freedom and that of her children. Rosa Marks, Nancy Syphax, and the King and Williams families lived on the second floor of the slave quarters in the 1840s and the United States Army occupied the property during the Civil War. ...” Oak Grove Restoration Company.
Close-up of entrance to the Decatur House Museum image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, June 20, 2010
6. Close-up of entrance to the Decatur House Museum
The newly renovated Decatur House - viewed from across H Street image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, June 20, 2010
7. The newly renovated Decatur House - viewed from across H Street
with markers visible on the wall at lower left.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 10, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 15, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,738 times since then and 22 times this year. Last updated on May 23, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 15, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on May 23, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   6, 7. submitted on June 22, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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