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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Stafford in Stafford County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Robertson-Towson House

Circa 1820

 
 
The Robertson-Towson House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., September 19, 2009
1. The Robertson-Towson House Marker
Inscription. When Benjamin Henry Latrobe, architect of the U.S. Capitol, visited Stafford in 1806, he found on this “beautiful little knoll in the midst of the woods close to his quarry…a log house,” the home of quarryman William Robertson. Robertson’s quarry was, and had been, contributing Aquia stone, or sandstone, for construction of the United States Capitol.

After Robertson’s death in 1818, Baltimore architect and stone carver, Thomas Towson, acquired the land. Towson designed and built a unique all-sandstone house whose walls remain today. Towson continued to operate the quarry, and stone from this site was used in buildings across the mid-Atlantic.

The preservation and stabilization project of this house was completed in2002 by Richard Wolff, President and CEO of Geo. H. Rucker Realty Corporation of McLean, Virginia, and the developer of Austin Ridge. This house is a tangible reminder of a quarry and stone the materially contributed to the growth of the nation.
 
Erected 2009 by Geo. H. Rucker Realty Corporation in support of a local Boy Scout Eagle Project.
 
Location. 38° 26.514′ N, 77° 25.489′ W. Marker is in Stafford, Virginia, in Stafford County. Marker is on Gunston Court. Touch for map
The Robertson-Towson House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., September 19, 2009
2. The Robertson-Towson House Marker
The Robertson-Towson House prior to 2002 preservation project.
. Marker is at the Austin Ridge Community Center. Marker is in this post office area: Stafford VA 22554, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Robertson Quarry (approx. 0.2 miles away); Austin Run Pyrite Mine (approx. 1.1 miles away); Peyton’s Ordinary (approx. 1.3 miles away); Mary Kittamaquund (approx. 1.3 miles away); Accokeek Iron Furnace (approx. 1.5 miles away); In Memory of September 11, 2001 (approx. 1.5 miles away); Lincoln Visit (approx. 1.6 miles away); English Knot Garden (approx. 1.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Stafford.
 
More about this marker. On September 19, 2009, the marker was placed by a group of Boy Scouts as part of one of the Scout's Eagle Scout project.
 
Also see . . .  Stafford Scout soars to Eagle. A brief account of the story behind the marker, which was researched and installed as part of an Eagle Scout project. (Submitted on June 7, 2010, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceSettlements & Settlers
 
The Robertson-Towson House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., September 19, 2009
3. The Robertson-Towson House Marker
Robertson home site, 1806, sketched by Benjamin Henry Latrobe.
The Robertson-Towson House and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., September 19, 2009
4. The Robertson-Towson House and Marker
Inside the Robertson-Towson House image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., September 19, 2009
5. Inside the Robertson-Towson House
Three fireboxes in the single chimney show the building had living areas on three floors.
The Robertson-Towson House image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., September 19, 2009
6. The Robertson-Towson House
The outline of what may have been the original log cabin can be seen on this wall of the Robertson-Towson House.
Rock wall near the Robertson-Towson House image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., September 19, 2009
7. Rock wall near the Robertson-Towson House
Wagon ruts are still visible at the bottom left of the photograph.
The Robertson-Towson House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., September 19, 2009
8. The Robertson-Towson House Marker
Quarrying marks still remain on stone near the Robertson-Towson House.
Inside the Robertson-Towson House image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., September 19, 2009
9. Inside the Robertson-Towson House
Though almost 200 years old, wood window frames still survive on the upper floors.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 27, 2010, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,280 times since then and 54 times this year. This page was the Marker of the Week June 6, 2010. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on May 27, 2010, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.
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