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Penn Quarter in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Chief Petty Officers’

Centennial Time Capsule

 

—2093 —

 
Chief Petty Officers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, CPO, USN, Ret., June 6, 2010
1. Chief Petty Officers Marker
Inscription.
The rank of chief petty officer - the senior position among naval enlisted ranks - was established by the Navy Department in 1893. A time capsule was placed within this foundation on 13 October 1993 to be opened in the chiefs’ bicentennial year 2093.

The chief petty officers serving in the 1993 centennial year are honored to pass on these items representative of our first 100 years of service to our country and navy to the chiefs serving in the 2003 bicentennial year. As we look to the future, we place our faith and trust in you to carry out the traditions of leadership, pride, and professionalism, and continue “Set the tone.

Our salute affirms our trust in you - the future chief petty officers of the United States Navy.
 
Erected 1993 by Chief Petty Officers of the United States Navy.
 
Location. 38° 53.643′ N, 77° 1.357′ W. Marker is in Penn Quarter, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker can be reached from Pennsylvania Avenue, NW west of 7th Street, NW. Touch for map. Marker is on the flagpole outside the entrance to the U.S. Navy Memorial Naval Heritage Center, just northwest of the escalator from the Archives/Navy Memorial/Penn Quarter Metro train station.
Chief Petty Officers Marker, U.S. Navy Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, June 6, 2010
2. Chief Petty Officers Marker, U.S. Navy Memorial
Marker is at or near this postal address: 701 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW,, Washington DC 20004, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. America's Main Street (within shouting distance of this marker); The Navy Memorial - from Bow to Stern (within shouting distance of this marker); The United States Navy Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); General Winfield Scott Hancock (within shouting distance of this marker); Ceremony at the Crossroads (within shouting distance of this marker); In Memory of Franklin Delano Roosevelt (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Grandeur for the People (about 300 feet away); Grand Army of the Republic (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Penn Quarter.
 
Regarding Chief Petty Officers'. Within the Naval Heritage Center at U.S. Navy Memorial, there is bell and plaque dedicated on the 100th anniversary of establishing the Chief Petty Officer rank (see picture below). It reads:

Chief Petty Officers
1893 - Centennial - 1993
United States Navy


100 years of
Navy Pride and Navy Leadership

The first Constitutional Navy of the United States was formally created on March 27, 1794 when President George Washington
Chief Petty Officers' Bell image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, June 6, 2010
3. Chief Petty Officers' Bell
and a related marker inside the U.S. Navy Memorial.
signed a bell into law to provide a naval armament of six ships.

This legislation also allotted numbers and ranks of the crews. At that time, the enlisted ranks were composed of ordinary seamen, seamen, petty officers, and warrants. Ninety-one years later, U.S. Navy Regulations Circular No. 41 of January 8, 1885, established the petty officer ranks of first, second, and third class, recognizing their seniority from other enlisted ranks.

On March 13, 1893, U.S. Navy Regulations Circular No. 1 authorized the rank of CHIEF PETTY OFFICER to take effect on or after April 1, 1893. The word “chief” means “taking first place” and denotes its senior position among enlisted ranks.

The 1914 "Blue Jacket’s Manual," a handbook written by and for sailors for over 100 years, spoke to the petty officers about their new position when they have been promoted to Chief Petty Officer:

“. . . The position of Chief Petty Officer is one of special honor. It shows not only that you have served successfully, but that your service has met with the commendation of your seniors, that you are proficient, trustworthy and reliable. . .

“ . . . the tone of the ship, the tone of the service itself must come directly from the Chief Petty Officers more than from any other group of people in the Navy. You have the standard; live up to
U.S. Navy CPO insignia (E-7) image. Click for full size.
4. U.S. Navy CPO insignia (E-7)
it. . . and you will find that those under you will be more inclined to do likewise.”

We, the Chief Petty Officers, serving the second 100 years of duty to our Country and our Navy, dedicate the sounding of this bell as a symbol of our continued dedication to “Setting The Tone” as our comrades-in-arms have done so bravely before us.

This ship’s bell, known hereafter as “The Chiefs’ Bell”, is presented to the U.S. Navy Memorial by the Chief Petty Officers now serving in the United States Navy.

1 April 1993

The privilege of sounding the Chiefs’ Bell belongs to all Chief Petty Officers.
 
Also see . . .  Chief Petty Officer. (Submitted on June 8, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Categories. Fraternal or Sororal OrganizationsMilitaryPatriots & PatriotismWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 11, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 8, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 2,504 times since then and 60 times this year. Last updated on June 15, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on June 8, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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