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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Furnace Creek in Inyo County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Furnace Creek Ranch, Death Valley

 
 
Furnace Creek Ranch, Death Valley Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 12, 2010
1. Furnace Creek Ranch, Death Valley Marker
Inscription. Furnace Creek is a spring fed stream flowing into Death Valley. Native Americans lived here centuries prior to its discovery by lost Forty Niners. In 1881, Aaron Winters found borax nearby, and sold his claims and water rights to William Tell Coleman. Greenland Ranch was constructed at this site to support the borax workmen and twenty-mule teams. Francis Marion Smith acquired the site for his company which became US Borax and renamed it Furnace Creek Ranch. They produced borax in the valley until 1927.

The Ranch was opened to guests in 1932. The Museum was set up by Harry Gower and Ann Rosener in 1954 in the oldest structure in the Valley, built about 1883.

Fred Harvey Company purchased the Death Valley properties from US Borax in 1969.


 
Erected 1996 by E Clampus Vitus, Slim Princess Chapter No. 395.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the E Clampus Vitus marker series.
 
Location. 36° 27.342′ N, 116° 52.005′ W. Marker is in Furnace Creek, California, in Inyo County. Marker is on California Route 190 near Greenland Ranch Road, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Located at the Museum, Furnance Creek Ranch driveway, Death Valley. Marker is in this post office area: Death Valley CA 92328, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Furnace Creek Ranch, Death Valley Marker with Museum image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 12, 2010
2. Furnace Creek Ranch, Death Valley Marker with Museum
At least 8 other markers are within 9 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. 20 Mule Team Wagon Train (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Old Dinah (about 500 feet away); Death Valley 49ers Gateway (approx. 0.9 miles away); Stephen Tyng Mather (approx. one mile away); Old Harmony Borax Works (approx. 1.7 miles away); Borax (approx. 1.7 miles away); White Gold (approx. 1.7 miles away); Devils Golf Course (approx. 8.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Furnace Creek.
 
Additional comments.
1. E Clampus Vitus
The Ancient and Honorable Order of E Clampus Vitus (ECV) is a fraternal organization dedicated to the study and preservation of Western Heritage, especially the history of the Mother Lode and gold mining regions of the area. There are chapters in California, Nevada and other Western states.
    — Submitted June 20, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNotable PlacesSettlements & Settlers
 
Furnace Creek Ranch image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 12, 2010
3. Furnace Creek Ranch
Furnace Creek Ranch image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 12, 2010
4. Furnace Creek Ranch
This Building was constructed in 1883 by F.M."Borax" Smith, founder of the Pacific Coast Borax Co. The oldest house in Death Valley, it stood originally in Twenty Mule Team Canyon where it was office, bunk house and ore checking station for miners at the Monte Blanco deposits. In 1954 the building was moved here to serve as a museum. The objects within and around were assembled by the company so that visitors to the Valley might better understand the history of the region. The museum is maintained in the public interest.
Furnace Creek Ranch, 20 Mule Team Barn image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 12, 2010
5. Furnace Creek Ranch, 20 Mule Team Barn
Moved here in 1960 from its original site in Mojave terminus of the 20 Mule Team route. 1884-1889
Furnace Creek Ranch Museum image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 12, 2010
6. Furnace Creek Ranch Museum
DVRR 2 This 60 ton, oil burning Baldwin 2-8-0 Locomotive hauled borate ore from the mines at Ryan to the mill and main line at Death Valley Junction from 1916 until the railroad was abandoned in 1931. At that time it was sent to the United States Potash Co. in Carlsbad N.M. where it carried ore from mine to refinery for 25 years. In 1956 it was given to this museum by the United States Potash Co. now a division of the United States Borax & Chemical Corporation. ( 42864, Built February 1916, Philadelphia )
Furnace Creek Ranch, Ore Car image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 12, 2010
7. Furnace Creek Ranch, Ore Car
Furnace Creek Ranch, Miners Car image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 12, 2010
8. Furnace Creek Ranch, Miners Car
Furnace Creek Ranch, 20 Mule Team Wagon Array image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 12, 2010
9. Furnace Creek Ranch, 20 Mule Team Wagon Array
Furnace Creek Ranch, Death Valley Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 12, 2010
10. Furnace Creek Ranch, Death Valley Marker
Paramont Valley stage, Used on Beatty- Skidoo run, 1890-1910.
Furnace Creek Ranch, Water wheel image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 12, 2010
11. Furnace Creek Ranch, Water wheel
Furnace Creek Ranch image. Click for full size.
Ferris H. Scott, Santa Ana, Ca. - Western Resort Publications. Santa Ana, Ca. Color by Josef Muench, circa 1970's
12. Furnace Creek Ranch
Description on postcard:
Death Valley National Monument, California Furnace Creek Ranch Gates
The picturesque entrance to this historic ranch (178 ft. below sea level) where guests enjoy the outdoor life of a modern dude ranch in America's most historic and fabulous valley. Charter parties in large buses come and go every few days during the season.
Death Valley National Monument, California image. Click for full size.
Ferris H. Scott, Santa Ana, Ca. - Western Resort Publications. Santa Ana, Ca. Color by Josef Muench
13. Death Valley National Monument, California

A typical twenty-mule team borax outfit in the foreground with the majestic Telescope Peak looming up in the background some 11,049 feet above sea level. The base of this mountain is below sealevel and it is the highest point in the Panamint Range.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 20, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,736 times since then and 69 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on June 20, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   10, 11. submitted on April 4, 2011, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   12, 13. submitted on June 20, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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