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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Farragut in Knox County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Birthplace of Admiral Farragut

 
 
David Glasgow Farragut Birth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Margot Kline, February 3, 2010
1. David Glasgow Farragut Birth Marker
Inscription.
Birthplace of
Admiral Farragut
Born July 5th 1801

Erected by
Bonny Kate Chapter
D. A. R. Knoxville

Dedicated by
Admiral Dewey
May 15th 1900

 
Erected 1900 by Bonny Kate Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. Marker has been confirmed missing. It was likely located near 35° 51.173′ N, 84° 5.063′ W. Marker was near Farragut, Tennessee, in Knox County. Marker could be reached from Christus Way south of South Northshore Drive (Route 332). Touch for map. Marker was at or near this postal address: Christus Way, Knoxville TN 37922, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this location, measured as the crow flies. Admiral Farragut's Birthplace (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Old Cumberland Presbyterian Meeting House (approx. 3.2 miles away); Ball Camp (approx. 4 miles away); Memorial for Cofounders of Campbell Station (approx. 4.1 miles away); The Baker-Peters-Rogers House (approx. 4.1 miles away); States' View (approx. 4.2 miles away); Loveville (approx. 4.2 miles away but has been reported missing); Archibald Roane (approx. 4.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Farragut.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Other markers relating to Admiral Farragut.
 
Also see . . .
1. DEWEY AT FARRAGUT'S OLD HOME; Unveils a Monument at Low's Ferry to Mark Farragut's Birthplace.
Screen capture aerial view of the Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W.
2. Screen capture aerial view of the Marker
The grayish blob under the “pushpin” is the marker.
A May 16, 1900 article about the dedication of this marker published in The New York Times. (Submitted on June 24, 2010.) 

2. Farragut Marker Missing?. This blog article, from 2011, notes that this stone marker is no longer viewable and may no longer be there. The land has been sub-divided into private residential homesites and the development has security gates to prevent access. (Submitted on March 21, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.) 
 
Categories. MilitaryNotable PersonsWar, US Civil
 
David Glasgow Farragut image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 29, 2015
3. David Glasgow Farragut
This 1838 portrait of David Glasgow Farragut hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“President Abraham Lincoln considered the appointment of David Glasgow Farragut as commander of the West Gulf Blockading Squadron the best one he made during the Civil War. Sailing in the flag­ship USS Hartford on April 24, 1862, Farragut led his fleet of seventeen vessels in a successful run by the Confederate defenses, engaged and defeated the enemy flotilla, and captured New Orleans. Rear Admiral Farragut spent the next two years blockading the Gulf Coast and maintaining Union control over the lower Mississippi before preparing for the capture of the Mobile Bay defenses in August 1864. By month's end, Farragut's fleet had forced the Confederate surrender. This, the major victory of Farragut's naval career, earned him the rank of vice admiral. Two years later, in declining health, he was commissioned admiral.

This portrait was painted early in Farragut's naval career, when he was a lieutenant. ” — National Portrait Gallery
Imagery showing area now a private homesite. image. Click for full size.
Imagery © Google Map Data, 2017
4. Imagery showing area now a private homesite.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 31, 2017. This page originally submitted on June 24, 2010, by Margot Kline of Knoxville, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 1,559 times since then and 62 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on June 22, 2010, by Margot Kline of Knoxville, Tennessee.   2. submitted on June 24, 2010, by Margot Kline of Knoxville, Tennessee.   3. submitted on December 1, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   4. submitted on March 31, 2017, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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