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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Shade Gap in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Shadow of Death

 
 
"Shadow of Death Marker" image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, October 9, 2009
1. "Shadow of Death Marker"
Inscription. The name applied to this locality by Conrad Weiser and other travellers on the Frankstown Path in the mid-18th century. Its local significance is now unknown.
 
Erected by Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.
 
Location. 40° 11.308′ N, 77° 52.531′ W. Marker is in Shade Gap, Pennsylvania, in Huntingdon County. Marker is on Route 522 near Covered Bridge Road, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Shade Gap PA 17255, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Juniata Iron (approx. 3.2 miles away); Bedford Furnace (approx. 3.6 miles away); Admiral Wm Sims (approx. 3.8 miles away); East Broad Top Railroad (approx. 3.8 miles away); Burnt Cabins (approx. 7.6 miles away); Fort Shirley (approx. 7.8 miles away); a different marker also named Fort Shirley (approx. 7.8 miles away); Forbes Road (approx. 7.8 miles away).
 
Regarding Shadow of Death. Conrad Weiser was a pioneer Indian interpreter, and treaty maker, 1732-1760. The Indians called him "Holder of the Heavens. For thirty years, Weiser served as Pennsylvania's Indian agent and interpreter.

The
Shadow of Death Marker Beside Highway 522 image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, October 9, 2009
2. Shadow of Death Marker Beside Highway 522
Frankstown Path ran from Paxtang (modern-day Harrisburg) on the Susquehanna River to the Allegheny River, and passed through Assunepachla at the Juniata River.
 
Additional comments.
1. Possible meaning of sign
My Family owned a large tract of land near the Shadow of Death. It was passed through several generations, The land is known as Lockes valley. My Grandfather told me the early settlers were regularly ambushed by local Indians at the narrow pass known as Shadow of Death. I have reason to believe what he told me, And I can prove that Native Americans were indeed Hiding in the Mountain pass. When I was a young child I explored the mountains, and found evidence to support what he told me. What I was told could be a small part of history that has been lost to time.
    — Submitted December 15, 2010, by Jeffrey A Locke of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania.

 
Additional keywords. Conrad Weiser, Frankstown Path
 
Categories. Roads & Vehicles
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 29, 2010, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 2,242 times since then and 243 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 29, 2010, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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