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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Federal Retreat

4:30-5:00 p.m. July 9, 1864

 
 
Federal Retreat Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
1. Federal Retreat Marker
Inscription. The Northerners held, then lost, then retook the Thomas house grounds as the fighting ebbed and flowed in the stifling heat. Casualties mounted quickly on both sides. Union Maj. Gen. Lew Wallace could see that his numbers were dwindling and that the Confederates were coming in waves. Wallace gave the order to retreat.

"Under a raking of fire of both musketry and artillery," his troops pulled back and fled to the northeast past Gambrill Mill to the road to Baltimore. The Confederates had won the battle, but the Union had won a critical one-day delay in Lt. Gen. Jubal A. Early's attempted raid on Washington.

(Sidebar): Total Casualties
Estimates vary greatly for troops and casualties in the Battle of Monocacy. The Union had approximately 5,800 men and suffered 1,294 killed, wounded, or missing. The Confederates had 15,000 to 16,000 troops and 700 to 900 casualities.
 
Erected by Monocacy National Battlefield
National Parks Service.
 
Location. 39° 21.441′ N, 77° 23.461′ W. Marker is near Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is on Baker Valley Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located at stop four of the auto-tour of Monocacy Battlefield. This
Federal Retreat Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 12, 2011
2. Federal Retreat Marker
This photo looks northeast across the Thomas Farm in the direction of Araby Church Road. This is the direction of the retreat of the Union forces.
marker set is at the trail head for the Thomas Farm walking tour. Marker is in this post office area: Frederick MD 21704, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Thomas Farm (a few steps from this marker); Thick of the Battle (was a few steps from this marker but has been reported missing. ); Civilians Under Siege (within shouting distance of this marker); Final Attack (within shouting distance of this marker); Gordonís Decisive Attack (was approx. ľ mile away but has been reported missing. ); Final Stand (approx. 0.3 miles away); Clustered Spires of Frederick (approx. half a mile away); History of the Monocacy River Valley (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frederick.
 
More about this marker. The background is a painting of a Federal battle line in action.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Monocacy. National Parks Service site. (Submitted on November 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. 10th Vermont Infantry. Regimental History. (Submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. National Parks Service page on the 10th Vermont Monument. Note that the 10th
Thomas Farm Tour Stop image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
3. Thomas Farm Tour Stop
The Thomas Farm is stop four on the tour of the Monocacy Battlefield. The barn is part of the C. Keefer Thomas Farm, known as "Araby." The National Parks Service is conducting preservation projects to stabilize the Thomas house and farm buildings.
Vermont had two of its members awarded the Medal of Honor for actions here at Monocacy. Lieutenant George Davis' heroics are discussed on the nearby "Fleeing for Their Lives" marker. Corporal Alexander Scott, who was actually a Canadian citizen, saved the regimental colors from capture. Also linked on the site is a letter from Private George M. Douse, of the regiment, describing his view of the battle. (Submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

4. Monocacy Battlefield Markers. This marker is among several describing the battle of Monocacy, to "tour" the battlefield see the related markers. (Submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Final Attacks at Thomas Farm image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 26, 2007
4. Final Attacks at Thomas Farm
At around 3:30 p.m., Confederate General Clement Evans led his brigade forward, through the Thomas Farm and attacked the left flank of Union General James Ricketts' Division. The Federal defensive line stretched across the open fields in the center frame. The Confederate line of attack was from the point of view of this photograph.
Terry's Attack on the Federal Right image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 26, 2007
5. Terry's Attack on the Federal Right
On the opposite side of the field from Evans' Brigade, at around 4 p.m., Confederate General William Terry led his brigade forward to drive back the Federal right flank. As the attack gained momentum, Union troops fell back to the Georgetown Pike (the historical name for what is now Araby Church Road along this section of the battlefield). That final position is beyond the trees and valley in the foreground.
10th Vermont Infantry Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
6. 10th Vermont Infantry Monument
Standing at the intersection of Araby Church and Baker Valley Roads, this monument was dedicated in 1915. The 10th Vermont had defended a position between the Thomas Farm and the Baker Valley Road before Evans' Confederate Brigade finally pushed them back. The monument is located where the 10th Vermont stood along with other units on the final Federal defensive line in this sector of the battlefield, along the historical trace of the Georgetown Pike.

Note the location of the Thomas Farm barn, seen in the background.
Inscription on the 10th Vermont Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
7. Inscription on the 10th Vermont Monument
This monument
was erected by the
State Of
Vermont

To designate the position of
the
Tenth Vermont Infantry
During the battle fought here
on the ninth day of July 1864
to save Washington, "and we saved it."
Seven companies occupied the Washington
Pike while three companies occupied
the Buckeystown
Road opposite the
Thomas House
1915
The plaque is in the shape of a Maltese Cross, the symbol of the 6th Corps, Army of the Potomac.
Federal Retreat Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2000
8. Federal Retreat Marker
10th Vermont Monument
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,563 times since then and 61 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on November 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on April 23, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4, 5. submitted on November 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   6, 7. submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   8. submitted on November 23, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.
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