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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bolivar in Tuscarawas County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Fort Laurens

 
 
Fort Laurens Marker image. Click for full size.
By Carl Breth, circa October 2007
1. Fort Laurens Marker
Inscription. The first and only fort of the Revolutionary War, established within the limits of what is now Ohio, was built here in December 1778 by General Lachlan McIntosh, as a defense against the British and Indians, and held until early in August 1779 when it was relieved and abandoned.

It was named in honor of Henry Laurens, President of the Continental Congress.

The small garrison, commanded successively by Colonel John Gibson, Major Frederick Ward Vernon, and Lieutenant Colonel Richard Campbell suffered much from hunger and attacks by the Indian allies of Great Britain.

A number of American soldiers were killed here, and buried near the fort.
 
Erected 1928 by The Ohio Daughters Of The American Revolution on September 21.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 40° 38.372′ N, 81° 27.34′ W. Marker is in Bolivar, Ohio, in Tuscarawas County. Marker can be reached from SW Park Avenue (County Route 102). Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Bolivar OH 44612, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Unknown Soldier (a few steps from this marker);
Fort Laurens Marker image. Click for full size.
By Carl Breth, circa October 2007
2. Fort Laurens Marker
In Commemoration of Our Patriot Ancestors (within shouting distance of this marker); Treaty of Greene Ville (approx. 1.3 miles away); Zoar Cemetery (approx. 2.1 miles away); Zoar Garden (approx. 2˝ miles away); Zoar Village (approx. 2˝ miles away); Zoar Town Hall / Zoar and The Ohio & Erie Canal (approx. 2˝ miles away); Ohio and Erie Canal (approx. 2.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bolivar.
 
Regarding Fort Laurens. The Fort is no longer in existence but there is an outline of the old fort on the ground. There is also a visitor’s center located there.
 
Categories. MilitaryWar, US Revolutionary
 
Fort Laurens Visitors Center image. Click for full size.
By Carl Breth, October 2007
3. Fort Laurens Visitors Center
The Ohio Society Sons of the American Revolution Marker Closeup image. Click for full size.
By Carl Breth, October 30, 2007
4. The Ohio Society Sons of the American Revolution Marker Closeup
“In commemoration of our Patriot ancestors who served with the 8th Pennsylvania and the 13th Virginia regiments at Fort Laurens from November 18, 1778–August 2, 1779. To assure that their sacrifice to the newly founded Republic was not in vain, we pledge ourselves to maintain in perpetuity these United States of America. —The Ohio Society, Sons of the American Revolution in the Bicentennial Year, May 9, 1976.”
Henry Laurens image. Click for full size.
By John Singleton Copeley, 1782
5. Henry Laurens
detail of a 1782 portrait of John Laurens by John Singleton Copley in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“South Carolina merchant and planter Henry Laurens, sent by the Continental Congress to secure a much ­needed loan from Holland, was captured by the British on the high seas and imprisoned for fifteen months in the Tower of London. Finally exchanged after the Battle of Yorktown for General Charles Cornwallis, Laurens posed for this portrait in his capacity as president of the Continental Congress (1777-78). Shortly thereafter he was instructed to join Benjamin Franklin, John Jay, and John Adams as a member of the peace commission. Laurens arrived at Paris just two days before the preliminary treaty bringing the Revolution to a close was signed on November 30, 1782. He inserted a line in the treaty to prevent the British army from ‘carrying away any Negroes or other property.’” -- National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 20, 2018. This page originally submitted on November 3, 2007, by Carl Breth of Willoughby Hills, Ohio. This page has been viewed 1,344 times since then and 52 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 3, 2007, by Carl Breth of Willoughby Hills, Ohio.   4. submitted on November 4, 2007, by Carl Breth of Willoughby Hills, Ohio.   5. submitted on July 20, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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