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Washington in Wilkes County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Wilkes County Courthouses

 
 
Wilkes County Courthouses Marker<br>Current Location on Wall to Right of South Facade Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 13, 2015
1. Wilkes County Courthouses Marker
Current Location on Wall to Right of South Facade Entrance
Inscription.
1780-1785 West Side, Micajah Williamson’s tavern.

1785-1786 100’ South. Log.

1786-1804 150’ South. Clapboard. John Chisholm, Architect.

1804-1817 East. Commissioners purchased Ferdinand Phinizy’s two story residence.

1817-1904 125’ South. Federal style brick. Frederick Ball, Architect.

1903 Present courthouse. Burned Christmas Eve 1958. Flemish style brickwork.
 
Location. 33° 44.283′ N, 82° 44.333′ W. Marker is in Washington, Georgia, in Wilkes County. Marker is at the intersection of East Court Street and East Square, on the right when traveling west on East Court Street. Touch for map. The marker was located in front of the Wilkes County Courthouse, just to the right of the main entrance. It is currently affixed to the wall to the right of the entrance. Marker is at or near this postal address: 23 East Court Street, Washington GA 30673, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Remodeled 1959 (here, next to this marker); Wilkes County (a few steps from this marker); Bolton Factory (a few steps from this marker); 1911 Wilkes County Jail (within shouting distance of this marker); Jefferson Davis
Wilkes County Courthouses Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, November 15, 2009
2. Wilkes County Courthouses Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); The Dissolution of the Confederate Government (within shouting distance of this marker); Last Cabinet Meeting (within shouting distance of this marker); Last Cabinet Meeting of the C.S.A. (within shouting distance of this marker); Washington-Wilkes Vietnam Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Woodmen of the World Supreme Sacrifice Monument (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Washington.
 
Regarding Wilkes County Courthouses. When the present courthouse was rebuilt after the 1958 fire, the clock tower and brick trim were omitted, and the building had a flat roof. In 1989 the courthouse was again restored, replacing the clock tower (although shorter, and missing the original trim) and brickwork.
 
Also see . . .  Wilkes County Courthouse. The Wikipedia history of the courthouse. (Submitted on July 16, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.) 
 
Categories. Notable Buildings
 
Wilkes County Courthouses Marker (Right)<br>White Plaque reads image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, September 13, 2015
3. Wilkes County Courthouses Marker (Right)
White Plaque reads
Frank P. Milburn
Architect
Savannah Contracting Co.
J.E. Burgess, General Mgr.
Contractor
Wilkes County Courthouses Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, November 15, 2009
4. Wilkes County Courthouses Marker
The marker is located just to the right of the main entrance to the Courthouse.
Wilkes County Courthouse image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, November 15, 2009
5. Wilkes County Courthouse
The present (1904) Courthouse, as restored in 1989
Wilkes County Courthouse image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, November 15, 2009
6. Wilkes County Courthouse
The 1904 Courthouse, showing the rear addition made during the 1989 restoration
Wilkes County Courthouse National Register Plaque image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, November 15, 2009
7. Wilkes County Courthouse National Register Plaque
The Wilkes County Courthouse was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980, as one of 52 Georgia County Courthouses submitted as a single group.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 13, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 564 times since then and 19 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on April 4, 2016, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   2. submitted on July 13, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   3. submitted on April 4, 2016, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on July 13, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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