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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Lancaster in Worcester County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Rowlandson Rock

 
 
Rowlandson Rock Marker image. Click for full size.
By Roger W. Sinnott, July 25, 2010
1. Rowlandson Rock Marker
Inscription. Rowlandson rock is the site where captives such as Mary Rowlandson, her son, and others from Lancaster, spent their first night. The Indians holding them captive had just raided and burnt the Rowlandson Garrison and all of the buildings in town.

Any person that did not escape, was killed or held captive.

February 10 – 1675

 
Location. 42° 26.727′ N, 71° 42.02′ W. Marker is in Lancaster, Massachusetts, in Worcester County. Touch for map. Marker is deep in the woods, about 400 feet north of two large water towers at the end of Winsor Road, off George Hill Road. Marker is in this post office area: Lancaster MA 01523, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Rowlandson Rock (approx. ¾ mile away); Lancaster (approx. 0.9 miles away); Site of Mary Rowlandson’s Capture (approx. 1.3 miles away); Site of the Great Elm (approx. 1.7 miles away); Mary Sawyer’s Birthplace (approx. 2.1 miles away); "Mary Had a Little Lamb" (approx. 3.1 miles away); Birthplace of Johnny Appleseed (approx. 5 miles away); The Drake Home and the Underground Railroad (approx. 6.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Lancaster.
 
Regarding Rowlandson Rock.
The Rock Itself with Marker in Front image. Click for full size.
By Roger W. Sinnott, July 25, 2010
2. The Rock Itself with Marker in Front
Watch out for poison ivy!
On February 10, 1675/6, during King Philip’s War, Indian raiders led by Nipmuc sachem Monoco attacked Lancaster, MA, and carried off 24 hostages. One was Mary Rowlandson, the minister’s wife, who later wrote a detailed narrative of her ordeal. (The year was written as 1675 in colonial times, when each new year was considered to begin in March, but today we would call it 1676.)

Several other markers in central Massachusetts identify further sites to which Mary Rowlandson was moved during her 82 days of captivity.
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia entry for Mary Rowlandson. More about Mary Rowlandson. (Submitted on July 25, 2010, by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansNotable EventsNotable PersonsWars, US Indian
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 25, 2010, by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts. This page has been viewed 1,311 times since then and 101 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on July 25, 2010, by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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