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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Marietta in Cobb County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Georgia Military Institute

1851 – 1864

 
 
Georgia Military Institute Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, July 22, 2010
1. Georgia Military Institute Marker
Inscription. Opened in 1851 on a 110-acre campus, the Institute had a 4-year curriculum modeled after West Point. The cadet lifestyle was strict. Students attended classes all day followed by an hour-long drill, dress parades at sunset and evenings spent studying. Townspeople proudly supported the Institute and attended its functions. Cadets came from at least nine states and graduates included Major General Pierce M. B. Young, CSA. Although increased income from the school’s growth never kept pace with expenses, its financial future improved after the State acquired it in 1858. In the early 1860s cadets entered the military after reaching age 18, but in May 1864 all those remaining received their marching orders. After their departure, the school’s buildings were used in turn as a hospital for both sides and as a Federal headquarters and barracks before being destroyed in November. Only the adjoining private residence of the first superintendent, Col. Arnoldus V. Brumby, now called Brumby Hall, was spared. The cadets served at various locations in Georgia, then when the war ended in May 1865 they returned home as civilians. Despite much interest, efforts to reestablish the school in the following decade were unsuccessful, mainly due to lack of funds.
 
Erected 2009 by Cobb County Community Development Agency
Georgia Military Institute Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, July 22, 2010
2. Georgia Military Institute Marker
The parking lot for the Marietta Conference Center is in the background.
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Location. 33° 56.583′ N, 84° 33.117′ W. Marker is in Marietta, Georgia, in Cobb County. Marker is at the intersection of Powder Springs Street SE (Georgia Route 360) and Hedges Street SE, on the right when traveling south on Powder Springs Street SE. Touch for map. The marker stands at the front edge of the parking lot for the Marietta Conference Center, adjoining the entrance to the Brumby Hall property. Marker is at or near this postal address: 500 Powder Springs Street SE, Marietta GA 30064, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. McLeod Vault (approx. 0.2 miles away); Founder's Lot William Harris (approx. 0.2 miles away); William Root (approx. 0.2 miles away); Rest well, Miss Mattie (approx. ¼ mile away); Slave Lot (approx. ¼ mile away); S. V. Sanford (approx. ¼ mile away); Confederate Cemetery (approx. ¼ mile away); U.D.C. Confederate Soldiers Monument (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Marietta.
 
Also see . . .  Georgia Military Institute. The New Georgia Encyclopedia. (Submitted on July 28, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.) 
 
Categories. Antebellum South, USEducationMilitaryWar, US Civil
 
Georgia Military Institute Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, July 22, 2010
3. Georgia Military Institute Marker
Powder Springs Street, Georgia Highway 360, is in the background.
Georgia Military Institute Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, July 17, 2010
4. Georgia Military Institute Marker
Looking south on Powder SPrings Street (Georgia Highway 360)
Brumby Hall image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, July 22, 2010
5. Brumby Hall
Built by Col. Arnoldus V. Brumby in 1851
Brumby Hall image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, July 17, 2010
6. Brumby Hall
Built by Col. Arnoldus V. Brumby in 1851
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 28, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 1,077 times since then and 19 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on July 28, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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