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Barry Farm in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Church

2562 Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue, SE

 

—African American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC —

 
Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 3, 2009
1. Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Church Marker
Inscription.
Campbell AME, established in 1867 as Mount Zion AME, was an outgrowth of its overcrowded parent church, Allen Chapel AME, founded in 1850. When it moved to a location near the present one in 1890, Mount Zion was renamed for AME Bishop Jabez B. Campbell. Frederick Douglass attended Campbell’s dedication ceremonies and occasionally spoke at the church.

In 1950, under the leadership of Rev. Samuel Everette Guiles, the church organized the Campbell Civic Club, and began hosting NAACP strategy meetings and rallies to fight public school segregation. Church members were plaintiffs in Bolling v. Sharpe, a companion case to the landmark Brown v. Board of Education (1954).

[Photo caption:]
Barbara (left) and Adrienne Jennings, two of the Bolling plaintiffs, celebrate the Brown decision with their mother, Luberta Jennings.
Star Collection, DC Public Library : Washington Post
 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC - Funded by the DC Historic Preservation Office.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Washington, D.C. African American Heritage Trail marker series.
 
Location. 38° 51.557′ N, 76° 59.701′ W. Marker is in Barry Farm
Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 3, 2009
2. Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Church Marker
- visible on the brick, behind the hedge, to the lower right, bottom of staircase.
, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue, SE and Stanton, Road, SE, on the right when traveling north on Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue, SE. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2562 Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue, SE, Washington DC 20020, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Hillsdale (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Faith and Action (about 700 feet away); The Curative Powers of Nature (approx. 0.2 miles away); A Navy Town (approx. 0.2 miles away); Barry Farm - Hillsdale (approx. 0.2 miles away); Birney School (approx. 0.2 miles away); Nichols Avenue Elementary School/Old Birney School Site (approx. 0.2 miles away); A Museum for the Community (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Barry Farm.
 
Regarding Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Church. Campbell AME Church dates back to 1850 when members of the local free Black community organized Allen Chapel near Good Hope Village (now Garfield). Allen African Methodist Episcopal Church, as it is now known, remains the oldest Black church in Hillsdale. With the arrival of the Barry Farm Freedmen's settlement (later renamed Hillsdale) after the Civil War, Allen Chapel grew so large that a group split off in 1867 and formed Mount Zion AME Church on Mount
Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 3, 2009
3. Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Church Marker
view from the corner off Stanton Rd. at MLK, Jr. Ave., NW.
Zion Hill (now Douglass Road). A couple of decades later the church moved to a more accessible location, on Nichols Avenue (today's Martin Luther King, Jr., Avenue). The congregation dedicated its new building in 1890 - in a ceremony attended by Frederick Douglass -- and renamed the church for AME Bishop Jabez Campbell. After the building burned a few years later, the church moved to its present location, on property donated by a church member. The current building was completed in 1938. Under the leadership of Rev. Samuel Everette Guiles, Campbell AME hosted meetings and strategy sessions held by Consolidated Parent Group and the NAACP related to fighting school segregation. The Campbell Civic Club was organized to support these efforts, which led to the Bolling v. Sharpe case.
Among the members of Campbell AME Church were Barbara and Adrienne Jennings, two of the plaintiffs in Bolling v. Sharpe, which became a part of the landmark Brown v. Board of Education (1954). All of the Bolling plaintiffs came from the Hillsdale community.

Cultural Tourism DC
http://www.culturaltourismdc.org/node/1265
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. This is a list of Brown v. Board of Education markers.
 
Additional keywords. Anacostia;
Barbara, Adrienne & Luberta Jennings image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
4. Barbara, Adrienne & Luberta Jennings
Barbara (left) and Adrienne Jennings, two of the Bolling plaintiffs, celebrate the Brown decision with their mother, Luberta Jennings.
Close-up of photo on marker
Barry Farm; Hillsdale; National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

 
Categories. African AmericansChurches, Etc.Civil RightsEducation
 
Campbell A. M. E. Church Cornerstone image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
5. Campbell A. M. E. Church Cornerstone
Campbell
A M E Chvrch
Bvilt Present Site
A D 1924

Fovnded
A D 1868
Rebvilt
A D 1889
African Methodist Episcopal image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
6. African Methodist Episcopal
Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Church<br>2562 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 28, 2016
7. Campbell African Methodist Episcopal Church
2562
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 4, 2017. This page originally submitted on July 29, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,988 times since then and 172 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 29, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   4, 5, 6. submitted on January 8, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7. submitted on January 13, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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