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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Tampa in Hillsborough County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Dominican Proto-Martyrs of America

A.D. 1549   †   A.D. 1965

 
 
Dominican Proto-Martyrs of America Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, July 31, 2010
1. Dominican Proto-Martyrs of America Marker
Inscription.
Near this spot on Tampa Bay
Father Louis Cancer
and
Three Religious
In search of a mission site in lands of
the Timucuan and Caloosa Nations under
Royal Order of Phillip II of Spain
suffered martyrdom at hands of
hostile Indians.

 
Erected 1985 by Hillsborough County Historical Commission.
 
Location. 27° 56.412′ N, 82° 27.605′ W. Marker is in Tampa, Florida, in Hillsborough County. Marker is on Bayshore Boulevard north of Beach Place, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. The marker is mounted on a large rock set along the sidewalk opposite the seawall balustrade, and is part of the Bayshore Boulevard Linear Park. Marker is in this post office area: Tampa FL 33606, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Jose Gasparilla (within shouting distance of this marker); The Bayshore Boulevard (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); World's First Scheduled Commercial Airline (about 600 feet away); Hutchinson House (approx. 0.2 miles away); Site of Mirabella Fish Company (approx.
Dominican Proto-Martyrs of America Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, July 31, 2010
2. Dominican Proto-Martyrs of America Marker
Viewed along Bayshore Boulevard, and the linear park of the same name, looking southwest
0.2 miles away); Gordon Keller (approx. ¼ mile away); Royal Yacht Britannia (approx. 0.3 miles away); Spanishtown Creek (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tampa.
 
More about this marker. The marker overlooks the Davis Channel and a city marina where the pirate ship José Gasparilla is moored (when not leading the invasion of Tampa during the annual Gasparilla Festival).

The adjacent sidewalk stretches for 4.5 miles and is the longest continuous sidewalk in the world.
 
Also see . . .  The matyrdom of Fr. Luis Cancer. Fr. Cáncer ministered successfully first in Puerto Rico and then in Guatemala, before turning his sights to Florida, which, according to an early historian, he “always held deep in his heart.” Having secured laborers, provisions, and permission from Spain, Fr. Cáncer set sail from Veracruz, Mexico, accompanied by fellow Dominicans and an interpreter. On the vigil of the Ascension in the year 1549, this expedition sighted land just south of modern-day Tampa Bay (Bahía del Espíritu Santo). Fr. Cáncer celebrated Mass in Florida on the Feast of Corpus Christi. At first the missionaries were welcomed by the native peoples, who knelt in prayer as
Dominican Proto-Martyrs of America Marker image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, July 31, 2010
3. Dominican Proto-Martyrs of America Marker
Looking northeast to downtown Tampa
Fr. Cáncer chanted litanies to God and to the saints. Gifts were exchanged. Fr. Cáncer’s two companions, Fr. Diego de Tolosa and Brother Esteban Fuentes went ashore to stay with the natives, but they were killed on June 20. When Fr. Cáncer, on board a ship near present-day Safety Harbor, heard word of the killings, he resolved to journey to shore. As he made his way toward the woods, toward the natives who were hiding there, he was approached by a man who hugged him and began to lead him away. Then, apparently following a signal, Fr. Cáncer was surrounded by others; he was dragged toward the woods and clubbed to death.
(Submitted on August 15, 2017, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraExplorationNative Americans
 
Davis Channel and the <i>José Gasparilla</i> image. Click for full size.
By AGS Media, July 31, 2010
4. Davis Channel and the José Gasparilla
Viewed from near the Dominican Proto-Martyrs marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 15, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 1, 2010, by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida. This page has been viewed 817 times since then and 59 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 1, 2010, by Glenn Sheffield of Tampa, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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