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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Oshkosh in Winnebago County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Chief Oshkosh Monument

 
 
Chief Oshkosh Monument Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, August 4, 2010
1. Chief Oshkosh Monument Marker
Inscription.
Oshkosh
A chief of the
Menominee Tribe of Indians
whose greatest achievement
in this life was in giving
to this city the name which
will make it famous while
one stone remains upon another.

 
Erected 1911 by Col. John Hicks, editor and owner of The Oshkosh Northwestern.
 
Location. 44° 1.35′ N, 88° 30.951′ W. Marker is in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, in Winnebago County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Linde Street and Merritt Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is in Menominee Park along Pratt Trail. Marker is at or near this postal address: 520 Pratt Trail, Oshkosh WI 54901, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. First Catholic Mass (within shouting distance of this marker); War Veterans Monument (approx. 0.2 miles away); Kiwanis Clubs Gazebo (approx. 0.3 miles away); Camp Bragg Memorial (approx. 0.4 miles away); Webster Stanley (approx. 0.9 miles away); Civil War Monument (approx. 1.2 miles away); Grand Opera House
Chief Oshkosh Monument image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, August 4, 2010
2. Chief Oshkosh Monument

[Inscription on left side of monument]
Presented to the
City of Oshkosh
by John Hicks
1911
(approx. 1.2 miles away); The University of Wisconsin – Oshkosh (approx. 1.8 miles away but has been reported missing). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Oshkosh.
 
Also see . . .
1. Wisconsin Historical Society. Photo of Chief Oshkosh. "Menominee chief Oshkosh was born in 1795, probably near Nekoosa (Point Bas) on the Wisconsin River." (Submitted on August 10, 2010.) 

2. Historical Marker Database. Point Bas. (Submitted on August 10, 2010.) 

3. Wisconsin Historical Society. 1897 newspaper article Proposal to Erect a Memorial in an Oshkosh Park. "...an event of a civil nature which occurred in 1840 was distined to give him more fame than anything he had done in war... the Postoffice department at Washington wanted an official name [of the settlement]." (Submitted on August 10, 2010.) 

4. Wisconsin Historical Society. 1911 newspaper article Memorial to the Chieftain of the Menominee. The address of acceptance. (Submitted on August 10, 2010.) 

5. Wisconsin Historical Society. 1911 newspaper article Oshkosh's New Monument. "[is] the work of the well known sculptor, Chevalier Gaetano Trentanove, whose Marquette, presented by the state of Wisconsin, is often spoken of as the finest piece of art enriching Statuary hall in the capitol at Washington." (Submitted on August 10, 2010.) 

6. Wisconsin Historical Society. 1917 newspaper
Chief Oshkosh image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, August 21, 2010
3. Chief Oshkosh
article. The remains of Chief Oshkosh to be moved to Oshkosh. (Submitted on August 10, 2010.) 

7. Wisconsin Historical Society. Photo. Chief Oshkosh Remembrance. (Submitted on August 10, 2010.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
Chief Oshkosh Grave image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, August 4, 2010
4. Chief Oshkosh Grave
Chief Oshkosh
1795—1858
A man of peace,
beloved by all.
Presented by
A.C. McComb
Chief Oshkosh Monument image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, August 4, 2010
5. Chief Oshkosh Monument
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 10, 2010, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 1,646 times since then and 50 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 10, 2010, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin.   3. submitted on August 23, 2010, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin.   4, 5. submitted on August 10, 2010, by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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