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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Olathe in Johnson County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Roads To The West

 
 
Roads To The West Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 12, 2010
1. Roads To The West Marker
Inscription.
The Santa Fe Trail
The Santa Fe Trail began in 1821 when William Becknell led a small group of men on a trading expedition from frontier Missouri to colonial Santa Fe. Mexico had recently declared its independence from Spain and abolished years of trade restrictions. The commodity starved village of Santa Fe welcomed Becknell. So began this international trade route between two nations, and for over fifty years the great freight caravans rumbled up and down the Santa Fe Trail. Traders and trappers, mountain men and soldiers, gold seekers and emigrants would all follow this trail; however its most lasting legacy would be as a two-way trail of frontier commerce.

In the Kansas City area the Santa Fe Trail has two trail heads coming off the Missouri River; Westport and Independence. Both routes met near present day Gardner, KS and then continued southwest as one route. The Santa Fe Trail was designated as a National Historic Trail by Congress in 1987.

The Oregon Trail and The California Trail
The Oregon Trail was the route for hundreds of thousands of people emigrating to the western frontiers from the late 1830's through the 1860's, laying claim to much of the West. It was a trail originally blazed by fur trappers and mountain men to and beyond the Rocky Mountains. By 1836, the Oregon Trail was
Roads To The West Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 12, 2010
2. Roads To The West Marker
Trails in the Kansas City area
being followed by missionaries to the Indians in Oregon Territory. In 1841, the Bidwell-Barteleson party left the Oregon Trail in Idaho and became the first wagon train to California. Today the overall route from Westport and Independence is commonly referred to as the Oregon-California Trail. By 1849, the rush to the Pacific shores for gold filled this trail. Starting in the 1850's stagecoaches also used it. But it is the image of wagon trains of families following the Oregon-California Trail to their destiny in the West that would be its most lasting legacy.

The routes followed by the travelers through the Kansas City area are shown above. The Oregon-California Trail and the Santa Fe Trail shared the routes until they split near present day Gardner, Kansas. The national map shows present day states for reference.
 
Erected by City of Olathe.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the California Trail, the Oregon Trail, and the Santa Fe Trail marker series.
 
Location. 38° 49.35′ N, 94° 49.816′ W. Marker is in Olathe, Kansas, in Johnson County. Touch for map. Marker is about 40 feet SE of the picnic shelter in Lone Elm Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 21151 West 167th Street, Olathe KS 66062, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of
Roads To The West Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 12, 2010
3. Roads To The West Marker
Route map
this marker. A Most Desirable Spot For Camping (here, next to this marker); The Travelers (here, next to this marker); Trail Campground..To Farm..To Park (here, next to this marker); Lone Elm Park (a few steps from this marker); Trails West (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Lone Elm Campground (about 600 feet away); Santa Fe Trail (approx. 0.3 miles away); Elm Grove Campground (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Olathe.
 
Also see . . .
1. Santa Fe National Historical Trail. (Submitted on August 13, 2010, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Oregon-California Trails Association. (Submitted on August 13, 2010, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Santa Fe Trail Association. (Submitted on August 13, 2010, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
4. The Interactive Santa Fe Trail. (Submitted on August 13, 2010, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
5. Lone Elm Park. (Submitted on August 13, 2010, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. ExplorationIndustry & CommerceRoads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
Roads To The West Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 12, 2010
4. Roads To The West Marker
At far left.
Lone Elm Park Shelter and Markers image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr.
5. Lone Elm Park Shelter and Markers
Lone Elm Park Logo image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 12, 2010
6. Lone Elm Park Logo
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 13, 2010, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 793 times since then and 55 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 13, 2010, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   5. submitted on August 12, 2010, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   6. submitted on August 13, 2010, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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