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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Greensboro in Guilford County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

British Attack

 
 
British Attack Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 1, 2010
1. British Attack Marker
Inscription. British General Lord Cornwallis placed troops on both sides of New Garden Road below the fields of Joseph Hoskinsí farmstead. Ahead of them the North Carolina militia, drawn up behind a fence line, was supported by two cannons in the middle of the road. The British artillery quickly positioned three cannons and began exchanging fire with the American artillery.

The British infantry formed a line of battle across the road, then advanced across Hoskinsí muddy fields. At 150 yards, the Americans opened fire with scattered volleys. Though staggered by this fire, the British regrouped, stepped over their dead, and continued to advance. At about 50 yards, they halted and fired their own volley, then charged with bayonets.

Lieutenant OíHara, a spirited young officer, was unfortunately killed, whilst directing the three-pounders before the line was ready to move on.

† † † † Banastre Traleton, British Dragoons
 
Erected by Tannenbaum Historic Park.
 
Location. 36° 7.795′ N, 79° 51.131′ W. Marker is in Greensboro, North Carolina, in Guilford County. Marker is at the intersection of New Garden Road and Battleground Avenue (U.S. 220), on the right when traveling east on New Garden Road. Touch for map
British Attack Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, March 15, 2015
2. British Attack Marker
A British encampment can be seen behind the marker.
. Marker is in Tannenbaum Historic Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2200 New Garden Road, Greensboro NC 27410, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Tannenbaum Park (a few steps from this marker); Hoskins Farmstead (a few steps from this marker); Tannenbaum Historic Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Guilford Courthouse (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Joseph G. Cannon (about 600 feet away); Crown Forces at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse (approx. 0.2 miles away); Capt. James Tate (approx. 0.2 miles away); Local Hero (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Greensboro.
 
More about this marker. The background of the marker features a picture of the British line positioning their three-pounder cannon before their charge. The lower right of the marker contains a map of the Battle of Guilford. It has a caption of “A British engineer drew this detailed map shortly after the battle. The two small rectangles at the bottom, near the British first line, represent unidentified structures on Hoskinsí land.”
 
Also see . . .
1. The Battle of Guilford Courthouse. Account of the battle from the American
Marker in Tannenbaum Historic Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 1, 2010
3. Marker in Tannenbaum Historic Park
Revolution War website. (Submitted on August 23, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Tannenbaum Historic Park. Guilford Battleground Company website. (Submitted on August 23, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

3. The Battle of Guilford Courthouse 1781. An account of the Battle of Guilford Courthouse from a British perspective from BritishBattles.com. (Submitted on August 25, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
British Attack Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 1, 2010
4. British Attack Marker
Joseph Hoskins farmstead served as the staging ground for General Charles Cornwallis' British troops prior to the Battle of Guilford Courthouse.
Greensboro Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 1, 2010
5. Greensboro Marker
Tannenbaum Historic Park preserves a portion of Joseph Hoskins farm. At the time of the battle, the farmstead totaled 150-acres.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 23, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 589 times since then and 50 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on August 23, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2. submitted on March 17, 2015, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4, 5. submitted on August 23, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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