Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Belvoir in Fairfax County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Influence of the Fairfax Family

 
 
The Influence of the Fairfax Family Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, December 14, 2010
1. The Influence of the Fairfax Family Marker
Inscription. William Fairfax:
fought in Spain for Queen Anne;
was a member of the Royal Navy;
served as Governor of New Providence, Bahama Islands,
served as an agent to manage, the Northern Neck Proprietary;
was a Vestryman of Pohick Church;
elected to the House of Burgesses (the elected lower house of the Virginia legislature) in 1741;
used his influence to create Fairfax County in 1742;
appointed by the Governor to be the first County Lieutenant and Court Justice of Fairfax County; served as a member and President of the King's Council of Virginia, a position second only to the Governor.

Fairfax Coat of Arms
Fairfax seal: The Fairfax motto "Fure Fat" translates to mean "To speak is to act," or literally, "Speak. Do." The motto forms the crest for the Fairfax County Seal.

Thomas, Sixth Lord Fairfax:
inherited the Northern Neck Proprietary, one-sixth from his grandmother, Margaret Lady Culpeper, 5/6 from his mother, Katherine, Lady Fairfax; resided at Belvoir 1748 circa 1761.
employed George Washington and George William Fairfax to survey his holdings in the Shenandoah Valley;
built Greenway Court, near Winchester, Virginia, circa 1751
transferred the Proprietary's land office from Belvoir to Greenway
Two Markers along the Trail Loop image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
2. Two Markers along the Trail Loop
Court
in 1761.

George William Fairfax
was the son of William Fairfax and Sarah Walker;
served as hand agent to manage the Proprietary;
was an officer in the Virginia militia;
was a member of the House of Burgesses;
was a Vestryman of Pohick Church;
was a member of the Council of Virginia in 1768-1769.

Bryan Fairfax:
was the son of William Fairfax and Deborah Clarke;
appointed Deputy Clerk of the County of Fairfax in 1754;
served as Fairfax County Justice between 1759 and 1774;
was ordained as an Episcopal minister in 1789, served Christ Church, Alexandria and Falls Church;
became 8th Lord Fairfax in 1800, and was the only son of William Fairfax to leave descendants.
 
Location. 38° 40.765′ N, 77° 7.778′ W. Marker is in Fort Belvoir, Virginia, in Fairfax County. Marker can be reached from Forney Loop, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Located along the Belvoir and Potomac View Trail, reached from a parking area off Forney Lane, on Fort Belvoir. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Belvoir VA 22060, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Neighborhood (here, next to this marker); Life at Belvoir
Bryan Fairfax, 8th Lord Fairfax, rector of Christ Church image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, December 14, 2010
3. Bryan Fairfax, 8th Lord Fairfax, rector of Christ Church
(a few steps from this marker); The Fairfax Family (within shouting distance of this marker); Gardens and Kitchen at Belvoir (within shouting distance of this marker); Belvoir Grounds and Potomac View Trail (within shouting distance of this marker); Belvoir (within shouting distance of this marker); Ferdinando, and the End of the Fairfax Ownership (within shouting distance of this marker); The Army Comes to Belvoir (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Belvoir.
 
More about this marker. The marker is on Fort Belvoir, an active U.S. Army installation. Please check the links below for site access information.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Lord Fairfax's estates in Virginia
 
Also see . . .
1. Access to Fort Belvoir. Details procedures for entering the Fort. (Submitted on August 31, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. 18th Century: Fairfax County's Golden Age.
Fairfax Coat of Arms image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, December 14, 2010
4. Fairfax Coat of Arms
The Fairfax motto "Fare Fac" translates to mean "To speak is to act," or literally, "Speak, do." The motto forms the basis for the Fairfax County Seal.
Page discussing the time and setting when Belvoir was built. (Submitted on August 31, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Colonial Era
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 31, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 685 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on December 16, 2010, by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama.   2. submitted on August 30, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3, 4. submitted on December 16, 2010, by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama.
Paid Advertisement