Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Salt Lake City in Salt Lake County, Utah — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

B'nai Israel Temple

 
 
B'nai Israel Temple Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bryan R. Bauer, September 2, 2010
1. B'nai Israel Temple Marker
Inscription. Designed by Philip Meyer, a native of Germany and a nephew of local retail magnate Frederick Auerbach, the B'nai Israel Temple was constructed in 1890-91. Henry Monheim, a local architect, supervised the construction. It is one of the few remaining structures built by Utah's early pioneer Jews and reflects their importance in the development of the economy, government, and educational institutions of the state. The design of this Romanesque Revival style building was reportedly based on the Fasanenstrasse Synagogue, a famous Jewish temple in Berlin. While the main elevation is rusticated Kyune sandstone, the side walls and the drum beneath the dome are brick.

The Congregation B'nai Israel was organized in 1881 and built a small synagogue in 1883 at First West and Third South. Following a division in the synagogue, the orthodox Congregation Montefiore built a new synagogue at 355 South Third East, and the reform B'nai Israel congregation built this temple. It was sold in the early 1970's when a new temple was built for combined local Jewish congregations. It has since housed several commercial enterprises including a restaurant and offices.
 
Erected 1993 by Utah State Historical Society.
 
Location. 40° 45.827′ N, 111° 
B'nai Israel Temple image. Click for full size.
By Bryan R. Bauer, September 2, 2010
2. B'nai Israel Temple
52.757′ W. Marker is in Salt Lake City, Utah, in Salt Lake County. Marker is on 400 East, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 249 South 400 East, Salt Lake City UT 84105, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Congregation Montefiore (approx. 0.2 miles away); Lone Cedar Tree (approx. 0.3 miles away); Lincoln Arms Apartments (approx. 0.3 miles away); Hollywood Apartments (approx. 0.3 miles away); St. Mark's Episcopal Cathedral (approx. 0.4 miles away); First Presbyterian Church Salt Lake City (approx. 0.4 miles away); Cathedral of the Madeleine (approx. 0.4 miles away); Modern Irrigation (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Salt Lake City.
 
Regarding B'nai Israel Temple. This was the second permanent house of worship for Congregation B'nai Israel in Salt Lake City. The original synagogue was located at 1st West and 3rd South. This building has been converted to commercial uses and now houses the Henriksen/Butler Design Group.

This synagogue is on the National Register of Historic Places.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. The first house of worship for Congregation B'nai Israel in Salt Lake City located at 1st West and 3rd South.
 
Henriksen/Butler Design Group image. Click for full size.
By Bryan R. Bauer, September 2, 2010
3. Henriksen/Butler Design Group
Building Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Bryan R. Bauer, September 2, 2010
4. Building Entrance
Note the commercial look of this entrance.
B'nai Israel Temple image. Click for full size.
Jack Smith and Utah State Historical Society, circa May 1978
5. B'nai Israel Temple
This NRHP photo shows the Temple in 1978 when placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Placed November 16, 1978. #78002666
Note "The Royal Palace" sign at the entrance which has since been removed.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 16, 2010, by Bryan R. Bauer of Kearns, Ut 84118. This page has been viewed 943 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 16, 2010, by Bryan R. Bauer of Kearns, Ut 84118.   5. submitted on September 18, 2010. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement